Upcoming ILCs

Confirmed ILCs for Spring 2015

Two-Course ILCs

ILC 1: Washington Internship — GOV 395 & GOV 396

This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Washington, DC. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Washington, DC (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor.


GOV 395-ILC Washington Internship — Kraus — TBA
GOV 396-ILC Dynamics of American Government — Kraus — TBA

ILC 2: Albany Internship — GOV 390 & GOV 391

This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Albany, NY. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Albany, NY (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor.


GOV 390-ILC New York State Gov. & Politics — Kraus — TBA
GOV 391-ILC New York Legislature Internship — Kraus — TBA

ILC 3: Nutritional Strategies: Bacteria to Humans — MI 200 & NR 224

This learning community, intended for Nursing majors, looks at the cellular nutrition of eukaryotes (humans) vs. the nutrition of prokaryotes (bacteria). It also covers the similarities and differences in the structure, function and role of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins and trace elements in humans and bacteria.  Finally, it looks at the immunological aspects of nutrition across the human life span compared to the immunological aspects in disease prevention.


MI 200-ILC Microbiology — Bobbitt — Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00-2:30 pm


MI 200L Microbiology Lab — Select any section of MI 200L


NR 224-ILC Nutrition & Health — Zagorin — Thursdays 5:30-8:30 pm

ILC 4: Issues in Ethics and Medicine — BI 219 and PH 202

This ILC will pursue an interdisciplinary study of ethics, genetic engineering, biotechnology, and developmental biology. We will use our knowledge of these disciplines to bear upon central issues and practices in modern medicine. Topics may include: Suicide and euthanasia; abortion and assisted reproduction; the status and development of the human embryo and of stem cells; cloning and surrogacy; as well as gene therapy and animal experimentation.


BI 219-ILC — Gene Expression and Development — Cook — Wednesdays and Fridays 11:20 am-12:50 pm


BI 219L  — Laboratory for Gene Expression and Development — Select either section of BI 219L


PH 202-ILC — Medical Ethics — Danisi — Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:20 am-12:50 pm

ILC 5: Honors ILC, Human Sexuality and Feminist Film — GOV 291 and NR 212 (D)

This ILC intertwines the study of human sexuality and feminist consciousness. We will study women’s lived experiences across cultures, time and the lifespan.  Sexual values, attitudes and gender differences will be explored. The related advances in medical science, which have influenced individuals and society, will be discussed as they relate to sex and reproduction. We will also interpret several films to consider whether or not they can be regarded as feminist.

The ILC will be offered in the honors category. In addition, NR 212 meets the D requirement in terms of General Education Requirements.


GOV 291-ILC (Section 5H) — Special Topics: Feminist Film — Honors course — Moynagh — Wednesdays 6:00-9:00 pm


NR 212-ILC  — Human Sexuality (D) — Honors course — Gasalberti — Tuesdays 4:20-7:20 pm

NOTE: Students must register both for Section 5H of GOV 291-ILC and for NR 212-ILC. Because there are multiple GOV 291 Special Topics courses in ILCs, students must pay particular attention to make sure they register correctly.


Course description for GOV-291 (Section 5H) — Special Topics: Feminist Film

This course brings together the study of feminist theory with the interpretation of film from a gendered analysis.  We will read several classic and contemporary works in feminist theory which will give us some critical tools for analyzing many different kinds of films.  We will discuss whether or not the films can be regarded as feminist and what is at stake in making such judgments.

ILC 6: Marketing and Communication — AR 203 and MK 201

Students will create an integrated advertising campaign based on the computer art and marketing skills they will learn in these two courses. The joint project includes a full written marketing plan, including their proposed advertisement,  and a presentation to both professors as their final exam.


AR 203-ILC — Graphic Design — Needle — Choose section 6A or A2: Mondays and Wednesdays 2:40-4:10 pm or Mondays and Wednesdays 4:20-5:50 pm


MK 201-ILC  — Marketing — DeSimone — Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:40-4:10 pm

NOTE: Students must register both for MK 201-ILC and either Section 6A or Section A2 of AR 203-ILC.

ILC 7: Public Speaking for Business — FI 201 and SPC 103

In addition to addressing the apprehension of public speaking, this ILC is an ideal addition for the business student.  Utilizing principles of finance concepts, participants will learn how to effectively present financial information about their company to various stakeholders groups. Students learn skills that allow them to speak informatively, persuasively, and in groups. Through these techniques, students cultivate personal style that results in more powerful presentations, which is a skill that is important to one’s academic and professional advancement.


FI 201-ILC Financial Management — Tully — Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:20 am-12:50 pm


SPC 103-ILC Public Speaking — Fenley — Mondays and Wednesdays 1:00-2:30 pm

ILC 8: Developing Film Industries — BU 291 and EN 291 (W) (I)

This learning community explores both the business and the cultural challenges faced by a country trying to develop its film industry. Focusing on Ethiopia as a case study, we will compare its movies and its growing film industry to those in other countries.


BU 291-ILC Special Topics: Conceiving, Designing, and Building a Film Industry — Greenwald — Mondays and Wednesdays 2:40-4:10 pm

This course will focus on the challenges of, and processes for, building a viable and sustainable film and television industry in an economically developing country. The class will study the elements and characteristics that are essential to a functioning media industry including: artistic freedom; access to capital; government support and incentives; education and training programs; legal protections for intellectual property; distribution systems and technological infrastructure. Students will work on case studies and will analyze the film and television industries in several countries, from developed to underdeveloped.

The class will require significant research and writing by the students, and a final paper incorporating learning from both classes of the ILC.


EN 291-ILC Special Topics: African Cinema (W) (I) — Thomas — Tuesdays and Thursdays 8:00-9:30 am

This course will focus on the movies and movie industries of several African countries, including films in French and English as well as films in African languages. Students will watch internationally acclaimed, award-winning films. In addition to watching the films, students will learn about the history of the various film industries, including their troubled relationship to the film industries in the United States, Europe, and Russia. They will read the philosophical statements made by film-makers and film critics from those countries. Lastly, this course will focus on Ethiopia as a case study, and so students will learn about the history and diversity of cultures in that region of the world.

ILC 9: Film, Music, and Theatre — MU 291 and TH 218

The two courses comprising this ILC examine the intertwined arts of film and music. One course, TH 218-ILC (History of American Film), is a subjective examination of landmark films and their directors, stars, writers, and producers. The course aims at developing a grasp of the history of American cinema and the impact of great films on the twentieth century. The other course, MU 291-ILC (Music in Film), examines various ways in which films have used music to accompany, enhance, or serve as a part of action and characterization. Students examine the history of film music and learn to identify some of the diverse types of music used in film.

The ILC is open to all Wagner students regardless of major and assumes no prior training in music, theater, or other disciplines. Students are expected to attend screenings, live performances, and other presentations both in and outside of class.


MU 291-ILC Special Topics: Music in Film — Schulenberg — Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:20 am-12:50 pm


TH 218-ILC History of American Film — Tennenbaum — Fridays 3:00-6:00 pm


Course description of MU 291-ILC Music in Film:

This Special Topics course will examine the use of music in film and related media, considered broadly. It is open to any student and does not require any previous study of music. It fulfills one unit of the Arts (general education) requirement, and it also can be counted as a music elective for those with a major, minor, or concentration in Music. This includes Arts Adminstration majors taking the Music option.

The course begins with a short introduction to basic concepts and terms used in discussing music. After examining the use of music in nineteenth-century predecessors of film, including ballet and opera, it focuses on the many ways in which music has shaped, enhanced, and otherwise been employed in cinematic works. Films examined include classics of American and European cinema as well as less well-known works whose music is of special interest or raises significant questions and issues. Students carry out weekly reading, listening, and viewing assignments; written assignments include quizzes and two papers, one of them a detailed study of the music in a portion of a film selected by the student in consultation with the instructor. The latter paper is the basis of an aural presentation to the class that serves as the final examination.

ILC 10: The Teaching and Learning of Biodiversity and Ecology — BI 215 and ED 326

While this intermediate learning community (ILC) is open to all qualified students, it should appeal particularly to those students who are interested in biology and who might consider a career in teaching. This ILC is comprised of a biology course and an education course. Using a lecture/lab approach, Biodiversity and Ecology (BI215, 2215L) provides a guided tour through the six major kingdoms of life and also introduces the fundamental concepts of animal behavior and ecology. Using the scientific method, students complete long-term experiments and present their results in a scientific paper. They also get a behind-the-scenes tour of the American Museum of Natural History, where they learn how museum curators there earn a living. Teaching and Learning for the Inclusive Setting (ED326) provides a solid introduction to teaching, including foundational knowledge of history and philosophy of education and theories of learning, as well as developmental, cultural and political impacts on student learning. There is a focus on current topics in education, such as teaching in inclusive settings, understanding the Common Core State Standards Initiative, and using state standards, with a special emphasis on the relationship to science instruction. This course includes 20 hours of professional field experiences in inclusive settings in local schools, where the student gains real teaching experience under supervision. Using knowledge gained from both courses as well as current research, each ILC student completes a formal paper that serves as the foundation for an interactive panel discussion combining principles and practices of teaching and learning with content from the biological sciences.


BI 215-ILC and BI 215L Biodiversity and Ecology with Laboratory — Stearns — Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00-3:30 pm


ED 326-ILC Teaching and Learning for the Inclusive Setting — Frumkin — Mondays 11:20-12:50 and 1:00-2:30

ILC 11: Blues, Boycotts and the Journey towards the Promised Land — GOV 291 and MU 209 (D)

The pain, struggle, resilience and triumphs of African Americans are documented in many ways. During slavery a rich, imaginative oral tradition thrived. Black influence on popular and dance music became more and more apparent and the Negro Spiritual and Ragtime attracted much admiration. Post-civil war suffering produced the Blues. Blues and Ragtime blended, were influenced by literate whites and Creoles, and Jazz began. Meanwhile, Black leadership emerged anew and established itself.  A tradition of uniquely African American political thought gave strength and hope to African Americans even as it confronted the dominant culture, as Blacks sought to overcome cultural and systemic prejudice and struggled for equality. Literate thinkers, preachers and activists built on oral traditions and created a body of compelling literature. Blues and Jazz became “the American soundtrack,” broke down racial barriers and evolved into some of the most sophisticated improvisatory art forms the world has ever known. The power struggle of American Blacks has influenced and inspired liberation movements all over the world.


GOV 291-ILC (Section 11) Special Topics: African-American Political Thought — Moynagh — Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:20 am-12:50 pm


MU 209-ILC The History of Blues and Jazz (D) — Wesby — Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 11:20 am-12:20 pm

NOTE: Students must register both for Section 11 of GOV 291-ILC and for MU 209-ILC. Because there are multiple GOV 291 Special Topics courses in ILCs, students must pay particular attention to make sure they register correctly.

One-Course, One-Unit Team-Taught ILCs

Students who enroll in a team-taught ILC will earn only one unit and therefore must choose to earn credit for one of the two courses. For example, a team-taught ILC incorporating ED 291 and GOV 317 allows the student to earn one unit for either the Education course or the Government and Politics course, not both. The team-taught ILC will satisfy the ILC requirement.

ILC 12: From Table to Laboratory: Exploring Food Choice — HI 239 or PS 239

The course will be organized around three principal themes: sweetness, hunger, and our microbiomes. Why were people so driven to obtain sugar and to use it to satisfy such a high percentage of their caloric needs? Psychological and historical research reveals much about this. Furthermore, we now see sugar regarded almost as a toxin! Was the fasting of a medieval saint the psychological equivalent of “anorexia nervosa,” a disease first described by late Victorian doctors? And how does medieval fasting and Victorian anorexia compare to our contemporary understanding of eating disorders? We are alarmed by stories of food contamination but is our fear well founded? In our zeal for “clean” food and bodies have we overlooked the need to “feed” the microbes that live inside us? We will explore why there’s so much anxiety about eating.


HI 239-ILC From Table to Laboratory: Exploring Food Choice — Smith — Mondays and Wednesdays 2:40-4:10 pm


PS 239-ILC From Table to Laboratory: Exploring Food Choice — Nolan — Mondays and Wednesdays 2:40-4:10 pm

NOTE: Students must elect to register for the course in History or in Psychology. Choose carefully, as this course will only count toward the discipline for which you enroll. Completion of this single course satisfies the ILC requirement.

ILC 13: Civil Liberties, Human Rights, and Disability Studies — GOV 317 or SO 291 or MDS 291

This team-taught ILC focuses broadly on civil liberties and human rights in the United States as well as, more narrowly, the contemporary disability rights movement and its achievements. The United States prides itself as being a free country. But to what extent is freedom routinely denied to individual citizens in the US? Who suffers most egregiously from these denials? In this course we will examine these denials of rights and liberties to various marginal groups including but not limited to people living with disabilities. In doing so, we will use an interdisciplinary lens that combines the interrelated fields of constitutional law, politics, sociology, and disability studies. Throughout the course, we will explore the tensions that exist between broadly affirmed values in the US, such as liberty and equality. An experiential component will be built into the course in which Wagner students will work closely with a person with an intellectual disability with the goal of increasing access or equity for people with disabilities at the community, local, state, or national levels.


SO 291-ILC or MDS 291-ILC Special Topics: Disability Rights Movement: How Society & the Law Impact the Lives of People with Disabilities — Gordon — Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00-2:30 pm


GOV 317-ILC Civil Liberties and Human Rights — Ghosh — Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00-2:30 pm

NOTE: Students must elect to register for the course in Education or in Government and Politics. Choose carefully, as this course will only count toward the discipline for which you enroll. Completion of this single course satisfies the ILC requirement.

One-Course, One-Unit Team-Taught ILCs for First-Year Students Only

ILC 14: Maidens, Mothers, and Madness: A Feminist Philosophical Approach to Script Analysis — PH 204-ILCFY or TH 103-ILCFY

This ILC focuses on feminism and gender studies in dramatic theory, literature, and philosophy. We will look at how the disciplines of philosophy and theatre mutually influence each other with regard to gender norms. To this end, we will examine characteristic trends, positions and topics of feminist philosophy, and bring them to bear upon dramatic theory and literature. Conversely, we will investigate how dramatic theory and literature challenge and inform traditional philosophical norms. Topics will include: knowledge, politics, ethics, sex, gender, identity, alternative lifestyles, sexism and misogyny.


PH 204-ILCFY Philosophy and Feminism — Donovan — Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:20 am – 12:50 pm


TH 103-ILCFY Script Analysis — Ruff — Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:20 am – 12:50 pm


Required FY lab — Klein — Tuesdays 8:30-9:30 am

NOTE: This course is only open to students who have completed fewer than 9 units at Wagner College. Students must elect to register for the course in Philosophy or in Theatre. Choose carefully, as this course will only count toward the discipline for which you enroll. Completion of this single course satisfies the ILC requirement.

ILC 15: Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Science and Politics of Devastation — CH 291-ILCFY or GOV 291-ILCFY

Ever wanted to harness the fabulous power of weapons of mass destruction in order to gain friends and influence neighboring governments? This team-taught ILC will examine the science and politics behind nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons. In addition the course will examine the histories, ethics, and strategic values of nuclear weapon systems, and examine current strategies in non-proliferation, from both a domestic and international perspective.


CH 291-ILCFY Special Topics: Weapons of Mass Destruction — Richardson — Fridays 1:00-4:00 pm


GOV 291-ILCFY Special Topics: Weapons of Mass Destruction — Pinto — Fridays 1:00-4:00 pm


Required FY lab — Lemmerman — Thursdays 8:30-9:30 am

NOTE: This course is only open to students who have completed fewer than 9 units at Wagner College. Students must elect to register for the course in Chemistry or in Government and Politics. Choose carefully, as this course will only count toward the discipline for which you enroll. Completion of this single course satisfies the ILC requirement.

One-Course, One-Unit Team-Taught ILC/Expanding Your Horizons

ILC 16: Transatlantic Triangles: From Harlem to Paris to Nationalism in West Africa — FR 291 and HI 291

This EYH-ILC course examines the worldwide development of the Négritude Renaissance that originated in the United States. This intellectual and literary movement, though born in the United States, blossomed in Paris and is considered to have influenced several African nationalist movements in their struggle for independence from European colonial domination. Coming from an interdisciplinary approach (History & Literature), this course analyzes the triangular interconnectedness between America, Europe, and Africa and, specifically, how their fates were historically bound together by imperialism, colonialism, and slavery but also the Enlightenment and global literary movements’ ideals of rationality, liberty, equality, and independence. By connecting three continents, this course will provide theoretically and experientially informed perspectives on the leitmotifs of the first negro-literary movement, or “Negro-Renaissance,” born on American soil. Moving beyond the United States, we will explore how the “Negro-Renaissance” reached the French Antilles, Cuba, Haiti, and then France, from which young intellectual elite from France’s African colonies carried it to African nations. In this spirit, students will be exposed to readings from across the United States, to the Négritude Movement in The Antilles, Paris, and Africa. Using this wealth of global literature, we will ask historical questions meant to increase participants’ understanding of the “Black American wind” that swept to Paris in 1932, influencing Black intellectuals from Martinique to start a new literary current (“Légitime Défense”) and moved young African elites to reject colonial domination of their countries in the name of a militant Négritude.


FR 291-ILC Special Topics: Négritude, Harlem, and Africa — Stalcup — Thursdays 6:00-9:00 pm


HI 291-ILC Special Topics: Négritude, Harlem, and Africa — Traoré — Thursdays 6:00-9:00 pm

Tentative Plans for ILCs in Fall 2015

 

To help students make decisions regarding ILCs, below is a partial list of tentatively planned ILCs for Fall 2015.

– Washington, DC Internship: GOV 395 (Washington Internship) and GOV 396 (Dynamics of American Government)

– MI 200 (Microbiology) and NR 224 (Nutrition & Health)

– FI 201 (Financial Management) and SPC 103 (Public Speaking)

– Team-taught ILC primarily for transfer students: MDS 111 and PS 111. This ILC is primarily for transfer students but other students can enroll with permission from the instructors. Transfer students are required to do 30 hours of experiential learning in the Early Childhood Center on the Wagner College campus; for those students who completed the First Year Program at Wagner, the experiential component is helpful but optional.

 

Antium Font. Textbooks available on Reserve