Upcoming ILCs

You may fulfill the Intermediate Learning Community through a two-course ILC, a one-course (one-unit, team-taught) ILC, or by completing a semester or summer session abroad in a Wagner-approved program where you earn a grade of C or higher in two concurrent courses. Be sure to plan ahead with your advisor to fulfill this requirement on time.

Students are welcome to take multiple ILCs.


Fall 2016 ILCs

The following Intermediate Learning Communities have been tentatively planned for Fall 2016.

Students should select ILCs that do not include any courses they have already taken. For example, a student who has previously taken SPC 103 should not try to register for the ILC combining a unit of SPC 103 with a unit of FI 201.

Two-Course ILCs

ILC 1: Washington, DC Internship — GOV 395 & GOV 396

This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Washington, DC. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Washington, DC (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor.


GOV 395-ILC Washington Internship — Kraus
GOV 396-ILC Dynamics of American Government — Kraus

ILC 2: Nutritional Strategies: Bacteria to Humans — MI 200 & NR 224

This learning community, intended for Nursing majors, looks at the cellular nutrition of eukaryotes (humans) vs. the nutrition of prokaryotes (bacteria). It also covers the similarities and differences in the structure, function and role of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins and trace elements in humans and bacteria.  Finally, it looks at the immunological aspects of nutrition across the human life span compared to the immunological aspects in disease prevention.


MI 200-ILC Microbiology — Bobbit — Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00–2:30 pm


MI 200L Microbiology Lab — Select any section of MI 200L


NR 224-ILC Nutrition & Health — Fridays 9:00 am–12:00 noon

ILC 3: Public Speaking for Business — FI 201 & SPC 103

In addition to addressing the apprehension of public speaking, this ILC is an ideal addition for the business student.  Utilizing principles of finance concepts, participants will learn how to effectively present financial information about their company to various stakeholders groups. Students learn skills that allow them to speak informatively, persuasively, and in groups. Through these techniques, students cultivate personal style that results in more powerful presentations, which is a skill that is important to one’s academic and professional advancement.


FI 201-ILC Principles of Finance — Tully — Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:00–2:30 pm

This course has prerequisites. Please check the Bulletin for details.


SPC 103-ILC Public Speaking — Fenley — Mondays & Wednesdays 1:00–2:30 pm

ILC 4: The Mind in Crisis — PS 212 & PH 205

Philosophers and psychologists have raised certain basic questions about our mental life; and, when entertained, the questions have perplexed them throughout their histories.  This ILC explores some of these questions: Does consciousness exist?  What is the relation between mind and our physical organism?  Is there a place for mind in a scientific explanation of the cosmos?  What is the role of the unconscious?  The ILC also explores questions about the workings of mind in our everyday life and in psychopathology. All the questions are pursued with reference both to classical and modern thinkers.

PS 212-ILC Psychopathology — Groth — Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00–2:30

PH 205-ILC Philosophy of Mind — Danisi — Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:20–12:50

ILC 5: Mathematics and the Universe in Which We Live — AS 105 & MA 119

The stars of the night sky have attracted attention and aroused curiosity since the dawn of time. At first superstition and folklore were used to explain various astronomical phenomena. This gradually gave way and humankind began to discover that there was a certain order to the heavens which could be explained with the help of an important tool—mathematics. Hence, the goal of this learning community will be, not only to educate students in mathematics and astronomy, but more importantly to show them how to use basic mathematical concepts to unlock the mysteries of the Universe.

AS105-ILC Astronomy: The Solar System — Falabella — Tuesdays & Thursdays 11:20–12:50

Lab for AS105 is optional. Any section of the lab may be taken.

MA119-ILC Finite Mathematics — Lombardo — Tuesdays & Thursdays 6:00–7:30 pm

One-Course, One-Unit Team-Taught ILCs

A team-taught ILC is a single-unit course taught by instructors from two different disciplines. A team-taught ILC is a cross-listed course that fulfills the ILC requirement.

Students who enroll in a team-taught ILC will earn only one unit and therefore must choose to earn credit for one of the two courses. For example, a team-taught ILC incorporating SPC 252 and SO 300 allows the student to earn one unit of Speech or one unit of Sociology, not both.

If a student has already taken either course that is cross-listed in a team-taught ILC, the student may not register for the ILC. Students will not be able to earn a unit for a course that is cross-listed with a course they have already taken. This applies whether or not the previous course was a stand-alone course or was cross-listed in a team-taught ILC. For example, because SPC 252 is cross-listed with SO 300, a student who has previously taken SPC 252 or SPC 252-ILC may not earn a unit for taking SO 300-ILC.

ILC 6: Team-Taught ILC: Crime, Courts and the Media — JR 291 or SO 270

Crime is news, and today’s focus on digital journalism pressures reporters to deliver news about crime as soon as it happens, in real-time. Crime reporters need a solid understanding of the criminal process and court systems at the county, state and federal levels. They must know how to avoid convicting a defendant with their choice of words as they cover a trial, when to withhold details about victims of sensitive crimes, and how to determine if images of crime scenes are too graphic to post or publish. The course will also explore the public’s threshold for crime news and how covering crime can create panic or minimize harm.

JR 291: Covering Crime and the Courts — Regan — Tuesdays 6:00–9:00 pm

or

SO 270: Criminal Procedure — Martin — Tuesdays 6:00–9:00 pm

ILC 7: Team-Taught ILC: Constitutional Law, Religious Liberty, and Free Speech — GOV 316 or SO 291

This ILC focuses broadly on the study of constitutional law, with a special emphasis on the First Amendment’s Free Exercise, Establishment, and Free Speech clauses. In doing so, the following areas of constitutional thought and practice will be analyzed: the powers of the president, Congress, and the courts; their interrelationships; federalism; the rights of defendants in criminal cases; the rights of racial and sexual minorities; government aid to religious schools; religious symbols on public grounds; government endorsement of religion; limits of religious freedom; “high” and “low” value speech; prior restraint; and various “tests” and “standards” involved in free speech jurisprudence, including the “clear and present danger” test; the “actual malice” standard; and the “imminent lawless action” test.

GOV 316: Constitutional Law — Ghosh — Mondays 6:00–9:00 pm

or

SO 291: Special Topics: Law & Religion in American Society — Pinto — Mondays 6:00–9:00 pm

ILC 8: Honors Team-Taught ILC: The Role of Media in Crisis Situations — SO 291 or FM 291

This honors course will examine the role the media play in crisis situations.   It will examine the public responsibility of the media in public emergences, as well as the moral and ethical limits in how the media report and interpret such situations.  Case studies of the role the media have played in recent emergency situations will be examined to consider whether the media meet their professional and ethical obligations.  Particular attention will be given to cross-national comparisons between the role of media in crisis situations in the United States and Israel. Wagner students work with Hadassah Academic College (Jerusalem) students to draft joint projects comparing media response to crisis situations.


SO 291-ILC (Honors) Special Topics: The Role of the Media in Crisis Situations — Esser — Tuesdays 9:40-12:50

or

FM 291-ILC (Honors) Special Topics: The Role of the Media in Crisis Situations — Greenwald — Tuesdays 9:40-12:50


Tentative Plans for ILCs in Future Semesters

To help you make decisions regarding ILCs, below is a partial list of ILCs tentatively planned.

Washington, DC Internship — GOV 395 & GOV 396 (Every fall and spring semester)

This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Washington, DC. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Washington, DC (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor.


GOV 395-ILC Washington Internship — Kraus
GOV 396-ILC Dynamics of American Government — Kraus

Albany Internship — GOV 390 & GOV 391 (Every spring semester)

This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Albany, NY. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Albany, NY (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor.


GOV 390-ILC New York State Gov. & Politics — Kraus
GOV 391-ILC New York Legislature Internship — Kraus

Issues in Ethics and Medicine — BI 219 and PH 202 (Spring 2017)

This ILC will pursue an interdisciplinary study of ethics, genetic engineering, biotechnology, and developmental biology. We will use our knowledge of these disciplines to bear upon central issues and practices in modern medicine. Topics may include: Suicide and euthanasia; abortion and assisted reproduction; the status and development of the human embryo and of stem cells; cloning and surrogacy; as well as gene therapy and animal experimentation. BI 219-ILC — Gene Expression and Development — Cook This course has a prerequisite. Please check the Bulletin for details. BI 219L  — Laboratory for Gene Expression and Development PH 202-ILC — Medical Ethics — Danisi

Team-Taught ILC: Jane Austen and Game Theory — English and Economics (Spring 2017)

Description forthcoming.

 

Antium Font. Textbooks available on Reserve