Descriptions of Intermediate Learning Communities

Students may fulfill the Intermediate Learning Community requirement through successfully completing a two-unit ILC, a one-unit (team-taught) ILC, or a semester or summer session abroad in a Wagner-approved program in which a grade of C or higher is earned in two concurrent courses.

To track completion of the ILC, the Registrar will register students for ILC-REQ when they register for an ILC. ILC-REQ is a pass/fail notation on the transcript that indicates whether a student has completed an ILC. The purpose is to track the ILC requirement for the automated degree audit.

Students should plan ahead with their advisor to fulfill the ILC requirement before the senior year. Students are welcome to take multiple ILCs.

Students should select ILCs that do not include any courses they have already taken. For example, a student who has previously taken SPC 103 should not try to register for an ILC combining a unit of SPC 103 with a unit of FI 201.

A one-unit (team-taught) ILC is a cross-listed course that fulfills the ILC requirement. Students who enroll in a one-unit ILC must choose to earn credit for one of the two courses. For example, a one-unit ILC incorporating SPC 252 and SO 300 allows the student to earn one unit of Speech or one unit of Sociology, not both. Students may not earn a unit for a course that is cross-listed with a course they have already taken. This applies whether or not the previous course was a stand-alone course or was cross-listed in a one-unit ILC.

As with all other cross-listed courses, a one-unit ILC has a shared maximum enrollment. If one of the disciplines appears to be full, a student may enroll as long as another discipline for that course is open. For example, HI 239 is offered as a team-taught ILC with PS 239. If HI 239 is listed on myWagner as having an enrollment of 16 out of 16 while PS 239 is listed as having an enrollment of 12 out of 14, a student could register for HI 239. After the student registers, HI 239 would be listed as having an enrollment of 17 out of 17, and PS 239 as 12 out of 13.

Spring 2019 ILCs

This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Washington, DC. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Washington, DC (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor.


GOV 395-IL Washington Internship — Kraus

and

GOV 396-IL Dynamics of American Government — Kraus

This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Albany, NY. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Albany, NY (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor.


GOV 390-ILC New York State Gov. & Politics — Kraus

and

GOV 391-ILC New York Legislature Internship — Kraus

This learning community, intended for Nursing majors, looks at the cellular nutrition of eukaryotes (humans) vs. the nutrition of prokaryotes (bacteria). It also covers the similarities and differences in the structure, function and role of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins and trace elements in humans and bacteria.  Finally, it looks at the immunological aspects of nutrition across the human life span compared to the immunological aspects in disease prevention.

Historically, one section of MI 200 was designated for the ILC. Inviting students to take any section of MI 200 is a response to increased enrollment in the Nursing major. This is a temporary adjustment to meet current enrollment projections.


MI 200 Microbiology — Bobbitt — Select any section of MI 200


MI 200L Microbiology Lab — Select any section of MI 200L (one 2-hour lab per week)


NR 224-IL Nutrition & Health — Aurelus — Fridays 8:00–11:00 am

This learning community, intended for Nursing majors, includes an Honors section that looks at the cellular nutrition of eukaryotes (humans) vs. the nutrition of prokaryotes (bacteria). It also covers the similarities and differences in the structure, function and role of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins and trace elements in humans and bacteria.  Finally, it looks at the immunological aspects of nutrition across the human life span compared to the immunological aspects in disease prevention.

Students seeking a more challenging approach to the study of Nutrition & Health are invited to take any section of MI 200 to complete the two-course ILC. (Allowing students to take any section of MI 200 is both a response to increased enrollment in the Nursing major and the goal of providing an Honors section of NR 224.)


MI 200 Microbiology — Bobbitt — Select any section of MI 200


MI 200L Microbiology Lab — Select any section of MI 200L (one 2-hour lab per week)


NR 224-HL Nutrition & Health — Aurelus — Fridays 8:00–11:00 am

In addition to addressing the apprehension of public speaking, this ILC is an ideal addition for the business student.  Utilizing principles of finance concepts, participants will learn how to effectively present financial information about their company to various stakeholders groups. Students learn skills that allow them to speak informatively, persuasively, and in groups. Through these techniques, students cultivate personal style that results in more powerful presentations, which is a skill that is important to one’s academic and professional advancement.


FI 201-IL Principles of Finance — Tully — Tuesdays & Thursdays 11:20 am – 12:50 pm

This course has prerequisites. Please check the Bulletin for details.


SPC 103-IL Public Speaking — Fenley — Tuesdays & Thursdays 2:40–4:10 pm

The pain, struggle, resilience and triumphs of African Americans are documented in many ways. During slavery a rich, imaginative oral tradition thrived. Black influence on popular and dance music became more and more apparent and the Negro Spiritual and Ragtime attracted much admiration. Post-civil war suffering produced the Blues. Blues and Ragtime blended, were influenced by literate whites and Creoles, and Jazz began. Meanwhile, Black leadership emerged anew and established itself.

African American political thought remains a rich and indispensable resource for revealing both the aspirations and the injustices of the nation from its inception and before. This body of work confronts lived despair and promotes cultural flourishing at once. It challenges the nation to be more democratic, more just, more equal.

Many African Americans confronted the dominant culture, as Blacks sought to overcome cultural and systemic prejudice and struggled for equality. Literate thinkers, preachers and activists built on oral traditions and created a body of compelling literature. Blues and Jazz became “the American soundtrack,” broke down racial barriers and evolved into some of the most sophisticated improvisatory art forms the world has ever known. The power struggle of American Blacks has influenced and inspired liberation movements all over the world.

GOV 268-IL African American Political Thought (D) — Moynagh — Tuesdays & Thursdays 2:40–4:10 pm

MU 209-IL The History of Blues and Jazz (D) — Wesby — Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays 10:10–11:10 am

 

An “Expanding Your Horizons” Course with travel to Greece during Spring Break

Greece is often cited as the birthplace of western civilization and religion.  In this course we will examine this concept while surveying the history, art, architecture, and theatre of the Bronze Age Aegean and Classical Greek civilization.  Students will develop an understanding of ancient Greece through examinations of texts and written sources both ancient and modern, as well as material culture such as ceramics, sculpture, painting, and architecture, and finally through travel to Greece and first-hand interaction with ancient sites, monuments, and theatre.  This survey will work interdisciplinarily between both Art History and Theatre History, touching upon issues also relevant to the disciplines of Archaeology, Literature, and Religion.

AH 222 Nymphs and Heroes in Greek Art: A Survey of Ancient Greek Art and Architecture — Scott — Wednesdays 1:00–2:30 pm

or

TH 105-EL Theatre Appreciation — Ruff — Wednesdays 1:00–2:30 pm

“Tell me what you eat and I’ll tell you who you are.” In this ILC we will explore Brillat-Savarin’s most famous quote. By combining chemical and biocultural analyses, we will examine how foods have shaped our bodies, history, environment, and cultural practices. At the molecular scale, we will investigate the major food molecules and various chemical processes involved in cooking and food preparation. At the individual and social scales we will examine how food production, presentation, and consumption create ourselves.


AN 240-IL  The Raw and the Cooked: Anthropological Perspectives on Food (I) — Gagnon — Tuesdays & Thursdays 9:40–11:10 am

or

CH 291-IL Special Topics in Chemistry: The Chemistry of Food — DeCicco — Tuesdays & Thursdays 9:40–11:10 am

This collaborative history and theatre ILC will examine the modern Civil Rights Movement and create theatre performance pieces appropriate to ideas associated with the national fight for racial equality in the 1950s, 60s and 70s. The course will run as a colloquium and acting workshop in which historic texts and artistic works are read, shown, discussed and dismantled. We will discover truths about American history, the individual creative process in relation to the evolution of student ideas. Students will be asked to risk not knowing in order to discover. The course texts will include historic research materials related to students’ projects as well as selected readings, speeches, and archival films. Course materials will include—but not be limited to—props, costumes, and set pieces necessary for works.

HI 236-IL: The Civil Rights Movement (D) — Reynolds — Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00–2:30
or
TH 229-IL: Devised Theatre — McCarthy — Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00–2:30

Barbara Walters, Katie Couric, Diane Sawyer and Anna Quindlen. These women journalists and dozens more before them have worked tirelessly to break through the glass ceiling in the newsroom. It wasn’t too long ago when the only women working in a newsroom were the publisher’s secretary and the society page editor. This team-taught ILC examines, discusses and explores the creation and evolution of gender roles throughout history and across cultures. Through a balanced review of femininity and masculinity studies, and an exploration of pioneering women journalists, students will be challenged to critically examine ways that gender roles have been created and sustained. Are we in the midst of a revolution, or are we stuck in the status quo?

JR 291-IL Special Topics: Women in Journalism — Regan — Tuesdays 6:00–9:00 pm

or

PS 241-IL Psychology of Gender — Felix — Tuesdays 6:00–9:00 pm

This Honors ILC focuses on climate change.

EC 291-HL Special Topics: Climate Change — Leacy — Mondays & Wednesdays 2:40–4:10 pm

or

HI 291-HL Special Topics: Climate Change — Rappaport — Mondays & Wednesdays 2:40–4:10 pm

This Honors ILC for first-year students combines philosophy and computing to explore the social and moral issues surrounding firearm possession, use, and abuse in the United States. The philosophical discussions will be augmented by researching and analyzing data through programming in the Wolfram programming language. Students will learn exploratory data analysis, functional programming, and visual data representation to support their philosophical arguments.The course will have a strong research component and the entire class will participate in a research project.

Students must choose one of the following options for fulfilling Key Skills & Knowledge:

1) Registering for this course as CH 221 will count as a Sciences & Mathematics course in the Knowledge Areas and will provide the following Key Skills: intensive Technological Competency (TT), practice/exposure Oral Communication (O), and practice/exposure Quantitative Thinking (Q)
CH 221-HL Introduction to Scientific Computing — Sharma
or
2) Registering for this course as PH 203 will count as a Humanities course in the Knowledge Areas and will provide the following Key Skills: intensive Intercultural Understanding (UU), intensive Critical Reading and Analysis (RR), and practice/exposure Written Communication (WC)
PH 203-HL Ethics and Society — Donovan

Tentative Plans for ILCs in Future Semesters

To help students make decisions regarding ILCs, below is a partial list of ILCs tentatively planned.

This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Washington, DC. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Washington, DC (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor.


GOV 395-ILC Washington Internship — Kraus

GOV 396-ILC Dynamics of American Government — Kraus

This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Albany, NY. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Albany, NY (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor.


GOV 390-ILC New York State Gov. & Politics — Kraus

and

GOV 391-ILC New York Legislature Internship — Kraus

This learning community, intended for Nursing majors, looks at the cellular nutrition of eukaryotes (humans) vs. the nutrition of prokaryotes (bacteria). It also covers the similarities and differences in the structure, function and role of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins and trace elements in humans and bacteria.  Finally, it looks at the immunological aspects of nutrition across the human life span compared to the immunological aspects in disease prevention.


MI 200 Microbiology — Bobbitt


MI 200L Microbiology Lab — Select any section of MI 200L


NR 224-IL Nutrition & Health

In addition to addressing the apprehension of public speaking, this ILC is an ideal addition for the business student.  Utilizing principles of finance concepts, participants will learn how to effectively present financial information about their company to various stakeholders groups. Students learn skills that allow them to speak informatively, persuasively, and in groups. Through these techniques, students cultivate personal style that results in more powerful presentations, which is a skill that is important to one’s academic and professional advancement.


FI 201-IL Principles of Finance — Tully — Tuesdays & Thursdays 11:20 am –12:50 pm

This course has prerequisites. Please check the Bulletin for details.


SPC 103-IL Public Speaking — Fenley — Mondays & Wednesdays 1:00–2:30 pm

Thermodynamics is the branch of science that deals with the behavior of matter and its relationship to energy. It deals with systems that move from one equilibrium state to the next in a path independent manner. Linear algebra is the area of mathematics that deals with the study of vectors, vector spaces, and linear equations. In this intermediate learning community students will discover how linear systems and their transformational properties can be used to conduct a comprehensive thermal analysis.

PY 311-IL Thermodynamics — Falabella

MA 232-IL Linear Algebra — Shahvar

Both courses have prerequisites. Please check the Bulletin for details.

Previous Semesters

Fall 2018 Intermediate Learning Communities

Spring 2018 Intermediate Learning Communities

Fall 2017 Intermediate Learning Communities

Spring 2017 Intermediate Learning Communities

 

 

Antium Font. Textbooks available on Reserve