Courses

Course listings are taken from the 2010-2012 Wagner College Undergraduate Bulletin. Courses added since this bulletin are partially listed in the Registrar's section of this website.


EC 101 Macroeconomics.

The cycle of boom and bust, of bubble and crash remains a permanent fixture of industrial economies. For two hundred years these cycles have been superimposed on rising affluence in Western, and now more recently, in Asian economies. This course explores the causes of growth and cycles from the perspectives of different schools of thought. In particular, the roles of monetary, fiscal, and regulatory policies will be examined in the light of the historical and recent economic performance of the United States and other industrial economies. Offered fall and spring semesters.

EC 102 Microeconomics.

How does the market coordinate the buying and selling decisions of millions of consumers and businesses? How is the myriad of goods and services produced, as well as the incomes generated to buy them? This course examines the relationships between consumers, firms, markets, and government from orthodox and heterodox perspectives. It develops the economic analysis to understand the market economy. Topics that will be covered include demand, elasticity, supply, production and cost, and market structure. The markets for and utilization of labor, land, and capital are also examined. The role of government in securing the advantages of the market while mitigating its problems is also discussed. Offered fall and spring semesters.

EC 291 Special Topics in Economics.

Faculty may offer, from time to time, more specialized topics of interest.

EC 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics.

This course develops the economic theory underlying macroeconomic policy-making in the lying macroeconomic policy-making in the United States today. It considers competing theoretical perspectives including Post-Keynesian, Monetarist, and supply-side approaches and the debates on the role of government, taxation, and stabilization policy, the balanced budget and the national debt, and money and credit. The actual practice of fiscal and monetary policy is examined in the light of the influences of the international economy on the United States. Prerequisite: Economics 101. Offered alternate fall semesters.

EC 302 Intermediate Microeconomics.

Microeconomic theory is applied extensively every day in a range of business, governmental and not-for-profit organizations in manufacturing and service production, healthcare, and transportation. This course elaborates on and applies the core economic principles developed in Economics 102 to answer questions of allocation, organization, and pricing from orthodox and heterodox perspectives. Policy issues of anti-trust, environmental protection, and utility pricing are also explored. Prerequisite: Economics 102. Offered alternate spring semesters.

EC 304 International Finance.

This course will demythologize the worlds of foreign exhange markets, balance of payments and international financial institutions such as the IMF, World Bank and their affiliates. It will take a historical approach to unveil some of the major conflicts that are currently unraveling the world monetary system. We will also discuss some possible directions for the future restructuring of the system. Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 102. Offered fall semester.


EC 305 International Trade.

This course will explore modern trade theory with a major emphasis on developing and using economic modeling to explain the rationale and direction of modern trade flows. A discussion of changes in current practices of commercial policy in the context of new information technology and geo-economic structures will be included as well as the new European Economic Community. Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 102. Offered spring semester.

EC 306 Economics of the Environment.

This course analyzes environmental issues from an economic perspective. It draws on both orthodox and alternative approaches to examine issues of sustainable development and policies to correct environmental pollution and maintain habitat and species. Issues covered will include global warming, acid rain, ozone depletion, habitat and species preservation and the economics of recycling. Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 102. Offered alternate fall semesters.

EC 307 Health Economics.

One Unit. This course provides an overview of the health care sector and how to apply the principles of economics to analyze it. Specifically, the course will cover the demand for and supply of health care services, the structure of health insurance and its impact on social welfare, with an emphasis on the peculiarities of the health care market, the causes of market failures and the need for government intervention. The U.S. health care system will be compared to those of other countries and the current health policy will be evaluated based on such criteria as efficiency and equity. Prerequisite: EC 101, 102 or permission of the instructor. Offered spring semester of even numbered years.

EC 312 Economics of Genocide.

The course will explore the ways in which genocide is a logical extension of economic discrimination. This includes, but will not be limited to, an investigation of the economic motivations behind the 20th centuries classic cases of genocide: the Aghet (Turkish genocide against the Armenians), the Holocaust, the Khmer Rouge and the Hutu-power genocides. Examples of previous cases of genocide such as the 19th century attempt at the extermination of the indigenous American tribes will be brought in as appropriate. Prerequisite: Economics 101 or 102. Offered alternate spring semesters.

EC 313 Labor Economics and Industrial Relations.

While executive compensation has soared and dot.com millionaires have proliferated, more than one in five American children grow up in poverty. Inequality in the United States is the highest it has been since the Gilded Age of the 1920s. In this course we will examine why the rise of “winner-take-all” markets has coincided with falling incomes for the poor, and the roles of globalization, technology, family structure, immigration, and other factors in producing these outcomes. We will conclude the course by examining the history and role of unions, the practice of collective bargaining, and the legal framework for industrial relations in the U.S. Prerequisite: Economics 101 or 102. Offered alternate fall semesters.

EC 397 Economics Internship.

This is a faculty supervised work placement, of approximately 100 hours, in the field of economics.  This internship will give students an in-depth experience of the application of economic analysis in business, public policy, or international contexts.  Students will be required to submit written reports on their accomplishments, job performance, and the placement itself.  Research and writing requirements will be coordinated with those of Economics 420.  Prerequisites: EC101, 102, an either 301 or302; MA 108.

EC 397 Economics Internship.

This is a faculty supervised work placement, of approximately 100 hours, in the field of economics.  This internship will give students an in-depth experience of the application of economic analysis in business, public policy, or international contexts.  Students will be required to submit written reports on their accomplishments, job performance, and the placement itself.  Research and writing requirements will be coordinated with those of Economics 420.  Prerequisites: EC101, 102, an either 301 or302; MA 108.

EC 400 Senior Reflective Tutorial.

This course will be offered in the spring concurrently with the capstone course in economic methodology. It is in this senior tutorial that students will develop and refine skills in applied economics, such as data collection, manipulation, mining and date organization that are required for a major research paper. The reflective aspect of the research process will be emphasized. There are two tracks students may choose to follow. They can complete a practicum in the field of economics or design and develop an empirical research project independently. In both, students will use a high level of empirical data analysis with at least two regression programs as well as keep a research diary. The RFT will provide a forum for students to meet collectively to share, reflect on and discuss their research or practicum with each other. They will be required to orally present at several stages of the senior thesis to economists from Wagner College and at Seminars in the Greater New York Area. To be taken in conjunction with EC 420.

EC 400 Senior Reflective Tutorial.

This course will be offered in the spring concurrently with the capstone course in economic methodology. It is in this senior tutorial that students will develop and refine skills in applied economics, such as data collection, manipulation, mining and date organization that are required for a major research paper. The reflective aspect of the research process will be emphasized. There are two tracks students may choose to follow. They can complete a practicum in the field of economics or design and develop an empirical research project independently. In both, students will use a high level of empirical data analysis with at least two regression programs as well as keep a research diary. The RFT will provide a forum for students to meet collectively to share, reflect on and discuss their research or practicum with each other. They will be required to orally present at several stages of the senior thesis to economists from Wagner College and at Seminars in the Greater New York Area. To be taken in conjunction with EC 420.

EC 411 Industrial Organization and Public Policy: Big Business U.S.A.

How corporations work, how they grow, and how production is carried on; includes a survey of the relationships among market structure, conduct, and performance in theory and practice. The concepts of concentration, centralization, product differentiation, conditions of entry productivity, and performance are studied. Emphasis is placed on a history of corporate development, interpretations of the social role of the corporation, and a review of the effect of the main antitrust provisions. Prerequisites: Economics 101, 102. Offered as required.

EC 412 Economic Geography (I).

An analysis of the problems facing developing countries of the world as they attempt to industrialize, develop their economies and raise the standing of living of their people. Specific topics which are investigated include population, unemployment and migration, education, agriculture, natural resources, transportation, industrialization, trade and finance. All are interwoven to describe the character of these countries and to provide insight into their efforts to progress. Prerequisites: Economics 101 or 102. Offered as required.

EC 414 Economics of Discrimination (D).

Large gaps in earnings and differences in patterns of employment by race, gender, and ethnicity place many women and racial and ethnic minorities near or in poverty. Educational opportunities, access to healthcare, legal services, credit and housing, and eligibility for government programs can also differ systematically for members of different groups. This course explores these differences through readings, film, research projects, and field trips. In this process we will examine debates on the roles of biology, family, culture, and economic opportunity in generating inequality. Topics such as affirmative action and comparable worth will be discussed. Prerequisite: Economics 101 or 102. Offered alternate spring semesters

EC 415 Applied Econometrics.

This course is an introduction to applied econometrics, the field of economics in which statistical tools are applied to test economic ideas, and in which data are summarized in ways that can inspire new ideas. The primary objective is to provide a theoretical and practical foundation in carrying out econometric studies, with a focus on the applications of econometric techniques in economic analysis. Students will gain experience in using computers to analyze data sets and interpreting the findings of empirical results.

EC 420 Methodology and Research in Economic Thought.

This course will explore both the practical and theoretical ways of approaching research in economics. It will help students think about their research projects as well as include practice in the application of statistical and econometric techniques. Students will learn to reflect on the methodology in their research, to formulate testable hypotheses, and to manage data. Economic literacy both in written and verbal forms will be emphasized, with students completing a major research project. Prerequisites: Economics 101, 102, and either 301 or 302; Mathematics 108. To be taken in conjunction with Economics 421.

EC 593 Independent Study.

An opportunity for the more advanced student to pursue an independent research project developed by the student and supervised by a departmental faculty member. The project must result in a research paper approved by the department chair and the supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: approval by the department chair.