Fall 2014 Course Schedule

Fall 2014 English and Journalism Classes

See the PDF printable copy of the Fall 2014 English Brochure for a more detailed explanation of courses and requirements.

Introduction to Literature Classes (EN 110)


EN 110(W) Driving Through Fiction, Prof. Shore, TTH 1-2:30

This course is devoted to analyzing the elements that make up a fully formed piece of fiction. By examining the build, drive and meaning within short stories, novels and plays students will gain a higher understanding of why a piece of fiction is fulfilled. Students will develop their writing and analytic skills by exploring the language, style, characters and themes of each work.

EN 110(W) Literature and the Meaning of Life, Prof. Cameron, MW 2:40-4:10

This course provides the study of techniques and conventions of various literary genres such as poetry, novels, short stories, biographies, journals, essays, etc. The course explores the relationship between form and meaning, specifically how genre shapes our understanding of literature, the human condition, and life experience. All students successfully completing this course will develop wider literary skills and become familiar with a variety of genres. In addition, students will become aware of their strengths and weaknesses in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students will also learn to express ideas and thoughts with clarity, detail, and support. Furthermore, they will use writing as a mode of thinking and reading critically and analytically. Methods of instruction may include but are not limited to: class discussions, group work, essay and free writing assignments, written responses to literature, and in-class examinations.

EN 110(W) Literature and the Meaning of Life, Prof. Cameron, MW 4:20-5:50

This course provides the study of techniques and conventions of various literary genres such as poetry, novels, short stories, biographies, journals, essays, etc. The course explores the relationship between form and meaning, specifically how genre shapes our understanding of literature, the human condition, and life experience. All students successfully completing this course will develop wider literary skills and become familiar with a variety of genres. In addition, students will become aware of their strengths and weaknesses in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students will also learn to express ideas and thoughts with clarity, detail, and support. Furthermore, they will use writing as a mode of thinking and reading critically and analytically. Methods of instruction may include but are not limited to: class discussions, group work, essay and free writing assignments, written responses to literature, and in-class examinations.

EN 110(W): Contemporary Literature, Prof. Bellesi, TTH 6-7:30

In this class, we will be reading, discussing, and writing about the novels, novellas, short stories, memoirs, and literary non-fiction that have defined the 20th and 21st centuries. Authors may include Parker, DeLillo, Dubus, McInerney, Knapp, and Orlean.

Foundation Courses


EN 111(W) (I) World Literature: Revolutions, Prof. Arant, MW 8-9:30

The theme of this World Literature course is revolution—in times of pronounced cultural flux, what changes? What stays the same? We will consider questions of transformation and stasis by focusing on pairs of texts from a few countries in Asia and Africa. These pairs will offer us what one critic calls “windows on the world,” allowing us to think more carefully about other cultures and ourselves in relation to them. We will also practice our critical thinking skills through close reading and analytical writing.

EN 111(W) (I) World Literature: Women’s Voices, Prof. Florescu, MW 9:40-11:10

This course offers a unique exploration into the vastness of world literature as seen, lived, and transposed into words from women’s perspectives. By focusing on the exclusive feminine vantage point, students will sophisticate their understanding and reading of literature. Selection-wise, whether belonging to Africa, South America, Europe, Asia, or North America, this course also teaches students how to identity themes which are universally voiced from different geographical spaces. Consequently, students start thinking about literature as a valid form of international “language.” We will read Precious (U.S.A.), The Passport (Germany-Romania), Second Class Citizen (Nigeria), The Interpreter of Maladies (India), Woman at Point Zero (Egypt) and Stream of Life (Brazil).

EN 111(W) (I) World Literature: Women’s Voices, Prof. Florescu, MW 11:20-12:50

This course offers a unique exploration into the vastness of world literature as seen, lived, and transposed into words from women’s perspectives. By focusing on the exclusive feminine vantage point, students will sophisticate their understanding and reading of literature. Selection-wise, whether belonging to Africa, South America, Europe, Asia, or North America, this course also teaches students how to identity themes which are universally voiced from different geographical spaces. Consequently, students start thinking about literature as a valid form of international “language.” We will read Precious (U.S.A.), The Passport (Germany-Romania), Second Class Citizen (Nigeria), The Interpreter of Maladies (India), Woman at Point Zero (Egypt) and Stream of Life (Brazil).

EN 111(W) (I) World Literature: Short Stories and the Loneliness of Being in the World, TTH 1-2:30

The world is a lonely place, and perhaps no form of expression conveys a better sense of that than the short story. For about a century and a half now, fiction writers, rather than only writing comprehensive novels of human lives and societies, have also developed a form that lends itself to representing smaller fragments of experience. These stories often communicate a sadness, strangeness, incompleteness, or loneliness -- a sense that our place in the world is very uncertain. We will read a selection of short stories from all over the world, taking into special consideration how expressions of uncertainty arise from the geopolitical situation of a work's nation of origin.

EN 111(W) (I) World Literature: Short Stories and the Loneliness of Being in the World, TTH 4:20-5:50

The world is a lonely place, and perhaps no form of expression conveys a better sense of that than the short story. For about a century and a half now, fiction writers, rather than only writing comprehensive novels of human lives and societies, have also developed a form that lends itself to representing smaller fragments of experience. These stories often communicate a sadness, strangeness, incompleteness, or loneliness -- a sense that our place in the world is very uncertain. We will read a selection of short stories from all over the world, taking into special consideration how expressions of uncertainty arise from the geopolitical situation of a work's nation of origin.

EN 212 (W) Introduction to Literary Analysis and Theory, Prof. Bernardo, TTH 1:00-2:30

In this course we will explore various approaches to literary texts including: Psychoanalytic, Marxist, Structuralist, Environmental/Ecocritical, Feminist, and Gender and Queer Studies. As you read literature through a variety of lenses you will learn how to analyze texts and create persuasive arguments for interpretations of those texts. We will also focus on the skills necessary for literary critical writing and research. Some of the authors whose works we will read in the course are: Italo Calvino, Nikolai Gogol, Christina Rossetti, Octavia Butler, and Oscar Wilde.

 Core Courses


EN 225 (W) Ghosts, Vampires and Civilization in English Gothic Fiction (GS), Prof. Bernardo, MW 1-2:30

From the ghost stories of Charles Dickens to Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, we will explore the gothic in nineteenth-century fiction. As you reexamine your ideas about classic texts you will encounter new ones such as Le Fanu’s “Carmilla” (a female vampire tale that predates Dracula) and revise your notions about Victorian Britain. Our discussions will mine these texts for what they have to say about such subjects as gender, sexuality, empire, commerce and civilization. The course will involve critical reading as you work on understanding the narratives and writing as you sharpen your analytical skills.

EN 332 (W) Pirates, Puritans and the Revolutionary Atlantic World (H)(D), Prof. Thomas, TTH 11:20-12:50

Have you ever wondered where the original pirate stories came from? Would it surprise you to learn that the stodgy New England Puritans harbored pirates from the Caribbean? In this class, reading literature from colonial America, Europe, the Caribbean, and Africa from a comparative trans-Atlantic perspective, students will study a multiplicity of voices and literary figures such as pirates, puritan ministers, economists, adventurers, statesmen, journalists, and slaves. For the world we live in today, the eighteenth century was a foundational moment when three of the most significant documents for American culture and economics were written: the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, and Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations. Students will critically examine the unique literary culture of that time. This course is intended to be of general interest not only to English majors and future high school teachers, but also to majors in Economics, History, Political Science, and Business.

EN 330 (W) Shakespeare Survey, Prof. Hurley, MW 2:40-4:10

A survey of the plays, sonnets and at least one long narrative poem, with attention to both performance and textual aspects of drama. We will also be giving a significant amount of attention to film versions of the plays and to the contrast these provide to text and stage. (Required for Major. Prerequisite of EN212 or permission of the instructor.)

Elective Courses


EN/RE 203 Spiritual Quest in Literature (H), Prof. Kaelber, W. 6-9

A reading and discussion of novels, usually short, that follow the lead character as he or she searches for meaning and purpose in his/her life. Both more traditional as well as modern works are read. Some recent films are also considered. (NOTE: Students must elect to register for the course as English, or Religion. Choose carefully, since this course will only count toward the discipline for which you enroll.)

EN 329 (W) Creative Writing, Prof. Shore, TTH 2:40-4:10

This course is devoted to discussing and practicing the art of creative writing. Fiction is the focus. Forms such as the short story, play and novel will be examined. Poetry and other modes will also be analyzed. The goal in the readings will be for students to wonder, “how can I become a better writer?” In-class writing exercises are designed and intended to put one’s subconscious in the driver’s seat.

EN/FR 356 French Cinema: Retrogrades, Rebels and Realists, Prof. Stalcup, TTH 1-2:30

This course introduces students to the major developments in the history of French cinema. The course aims to develop students' skills of analysis and interpretation in order to enable them to read and appreciate film as an art form. The course is divided into three parts which present the three principal moments of French cinematic history; the films of Poetic Realism from the 1920s and 1930s; the films of the New Wave from the 1950s and 1960s and fin-de-siècle films of the 1980s and 1990s. Film-viewings are supplemented by the study of film theory. The class is writing-intensive and fulfills the International Perspectives requirement. Taught in English. (NOTE: Students must elect to register for the course as English, or French. Choose carefully, since this course will only count toward the discipline for which you enroll. No prerequisite.)

Journalism Courses


JR011 Wagnerian, Prof. Regan, TBA

Students work on the Wagnerian as reporter, photographer, editor or designer and earn a half-unit for their work. The weekly staff meeting takes the place of class time. JR011 can be repeated each semester.

JR 261(W) Introduction to Journalism, Prof. Regan, MW 6:30-8

This course offers an overview of the competitive and evolving field of journalism. Students will learn how to define news, write a lead, conduct an interview, use the inverted pyramid style of newswriting and follow Associated Press style. They'll learn how to distinguish objectivity from opinion and write obituaries, spot news stories and feature stories. Social media, ethics, online journalism and First Amendment rights will be explored. By the end of the semester, students will know how a newsroom works and have a solid foundation of skills to be a successful journalist in any medium.

JR 321 (W) Dying to Tell the Story, Prof. Regan, TH 6-9

Every day journalists risk their lives to tell a story to the world. Many of them are killed in the line of duty; the Freedom Forum Journalists Memorial in Washington, D.C. lists 1,913 names from around the world. Many others are permanently injured physically and psychologically by what they witness and record. Some even take their own lives. This course surveys work by the valiant reporters, past and present, who put themselves in harm’s way to shed light on unrest, tragedy and injustice. (prerequisite JR 261 or permission of the instructor).

JR 397 (1 unit) & 497 (2 units) Internship in Journalism

Journalism internships are part-time on-the-job experience at a New York area newspaper, magazine, television network, or public relations outlet. May be taken for one or two units. (Prerequisite JR 261, minimum 2/5 GPA in the major, and approval of the advisor to the Journalism minor.)