Academic Programs

Requirements for a Major in History (B.A.)

A minimum of 11 units, at least two of which at the 300-level, with the following distribution:
Foundation Courses - 1 unit
One survey course is required
  • HI103, HI104, HI115, HI120, or HI130
    *No more than two 100-level courses will count towards a history major.
Methods Course - 1 unit
  • HI 297: The Historian as Detective: Exploring the City
    *To be taken in Spring of Sophomore year if possible or in Spring of Junior year
Core Courses - 3 units (one in each subfield of courses listed)
  • American History: HI 215 Creating a New Nation, HI 221 The US and World War II, HI 236 History of Civil Rights (D), or HI 321: History of New World Slavery (D)
  • European History: HI 257: Sex, Power, and Identity in Europe before 1800 (W) (I), HI 286: On the Screen: Gender, Class and Culture of Film (W) (I), HI 334 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust (I); or HI 362 Renaissance Italy 1300-1600 (W) (I)
  • Non-Western History: HI 242 Modern African History (I), HI 264 Islam in the World (I), HI 330 Empires and Imperialism (I), or HI 347 Global Cities (I)
Electives - 4 units
Any courses at the 200-level or above count as electives. Students choose electives based on their interests.
Students must have two 300-level courses in history in which they write extensive research papers based on primary and secondary sources.
Senior Learning Community - 2 units
Senior Seminar - HI 490
Senior Reflective Tutorial - HI 400
Concentration Requirements (optional)

History majors are encouraged to pursue a concentration, which involves taking three or more of the eleven required courses for the history major in a particular area of study and writing the thesis in the Senior Seminar in that area. Pre-law students majoring in history are encouraged to concentrate in Global Justice and Human Rights.
Media, Museums and Public History
  • HI 229 Museums, Myths, and Memories (I) and any two of the following:
  • HI 225 History of New York City (D), HI 286 On the Screen: Gender, Class, and Culture in Film (W)(I), HI 322 History of Minorities in the Media, HI 325 Immigrant NYC, 1800-Present (D) and HI 362 Renaissance Italy 1300-1600 (W)(I)
Global Justice and Human Rights -
  • HI 201 History of International Human Rights (I) and any two of the following:
  • HI 227 The Exercise of Leadership (D), HI 235 Native American History (D), HI 236 H of the Civil Rights Movement (D), HI 237 Environmental History and Change in the Modern World (I), HI 321 History of the New World Slavery (D), HI 330 Empires and Its Imperialism (I), HI 334 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust (W)(I) or HI 345 Global History of Food
Independent Concentration
Any major who can link three history courses to a theme, may create their own independent concentration with approval of the department chair.
Dual Major in History and Childhood Education

The History major prepares future teachers with skills and a knowledge base that includes local and global perspectives, and addresses the state requirement that teachers become informed about the history of New York. The History component of the Dual Major consists of a total of 11 units, at least two of which at the 300-level, with the following distribution:
Foundation Course - 1 unit
HI 120: Global History
Methods Course: 1 unit
HI 297: The Historian as Detective: Exploring the City
To be taken in Spring of Sophomore Year if possible or in Spring of Junior Year
Core Courses - 3 units (one in each subfield)
  • American History: HI 215, HI 221, HI236 or HI 321
  • Gender and History: HI 257 or HI 286
  • Non-Western History: HI 242, HI 264, HI 330 or HI 347
Electives - 4 units
Any courses at the 200-level or above count as electives. Students choose electives based on their interests. Students must have two 300-level courses in history in which they write research papers based on primary and secondary sources.
Senior Learning Community - 2 units
Senior Seminar - HI 490
Senior Reflective Tutorial - HI 400
Must be taken in the Fall of the senior year. The Experiential Placement will be student teaching.
Requirements for Minor in History

A minimum of 5 units with the following distribution:
1 unit at the 100 level
4 units at the 200-level or above - 4 units. It is strongly recommended that at least one of these electives be in non-Western/global history.
Civic Innovations Option

Selected as one of six departments to offer Civic Innovations courses, the History Department Selected as one of the nation from the conquest and colonization of North America to the reunification of the United States at the end of the Civil War. Topics include: How did Europeans, Indians, and Africans give meaning to their experiences in the “New World” created by European colonization? How were the cultures of each group transformed by their interactions? How and why did the institution of slavery begin? How was the egalitarianism of the American Revolution reconciled with the reality of American slavery? What did “democracy” mean to the Revolutionary generation and which philosophical ideas most influenced the structure of government in the new nation? How did the rise of capitalism transform gender roles in American Society? What has been the relationship between democracy and capitalism? How did the political controversy over slavery cause American Civil War. Offered as required.