Annual Commemoration of Kristallnacht and the S.S. St. Louis

The Next Chapter: German Jewish Refugees in the U.S

What: This talk concentrates on German Jewish refugees who fled their homeland after Hitler’s rise to power and before the mass deportations began. Arriving in the United States before the end of the war, many refugees speak about America as the next chapter in their lives. Using memoirs and interviews, Dr. Judith Gerson looks at how they remember their emigration and resettlement.

Where: Spiro Hall 2

When: Wednesday Nov. 8, 6PM

Kosher Reception at 8:00—RSVP required–

This annual commemoration honors the courage, resourcefulness and determination of Egon J. Salmon, his parents Paul and Erna, and other relatives that enabled their family to survive.  It also recognizes Egon and his family for their contribution to the Jewish community of New York and to America from his role in the U.S. military in World War II to the present day.

Egon J. Salmon was an eyewitness to rising anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany and to Kristallnacht. His father Paul was arrested by the Gestapo and sent to Dachau.  With his mother Erna and sister Edna, Egon sailed on the historic voyage of the S.S. St. Louis, also known as the “voyage of the damned.”  On his 15th birthday, he saw the lights of Miami as he was sent back to Nazi Europe, having been denied entry to the United States and Cuba.  While others in his family fled to Bolivia, Uruguay and Shanghai, Egon was able to immigrate in 1940 to Staten Island. He returned to Europe in the United States military, serving in the Italian campaign and post-war German interrogations of Nazi criminals for the Holocaust, before even receiving citizenship.  Along with his wife Marie, sons Jon and Henry, and many grandchildren, his family has contributed to the flourishing of Jewish life and to business and community development in the New York region.

The commemoration will feature guest speaker Dr. Judith Gerson with comments by Scott Miller and a tribute to Egon Salmon by Monroe Klein.

Judith Gerson, Assoc. Professor of Sociology, Women’s and Gender Studies, and Jewish Studies, Rutgers University, SUNJ & Ina Levine Invitational Scholar at the Mandel Center at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Scott Miller, Director of Curatorial Affairs, U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.

The Story of Egon Salmon

Egon J. Salmon was an eyewitness to rising anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany and to Kristallnacht. His father Paul was arrested by the Gestapo and sent to Dachau. With his mother Erna and sister Edna, Egon sailed on the historic voyage of the S.S. St. Louis, also known as the “voyage of the damned.” On his 15th birthday, he saw the lights of Miami as he was sent back to Nazi Europe, having been denied entry to the United States and Cuba. While others in his family fled to Bolivia, Uruguay and Shanghai, Egon was able to immigrate in 1940 to Staten Island. He returned to Europe in the United States military, serving in the Italian campaign and post-war German interrogations of Nazi criminals for the Holocaust, before even receiving citizenship. Along with his wife Marie, sons Jon and Henry, and many grandchildren, his family has contributed to the flourishing of Jewish life and to business and community development in the New York region. Watch The Story of Egon Salmon
Video thumbnail 2 The Story of Egon Salmon