Arabic Courses

 

AB 101: Introductory Arabic I (I)

Today Arabic is the sixth most commonly spoken language in the world and one of the six official languages of the United Nations. This course is specifically designed for students who have little or no background in Arabic. They will learn to read and write as well as pronounce and recognize the alphabet of Modern Standard Arabic. As an introduction to the language, the course will include common phrases, greetings, basic everyday vocabulary, as well as an introduction to the various aspects of Arab culture. The class will implement the use of group work and activities to facilitate learning. Prerequisite: 0-1 year of previous experience with the language. Offered fall semester.

AB 102: Introductory Arabic II (I)

Today Arabic is the sixth most commonly spoken language in the world and one of the six official languages of the United Nations. This course is specifically designed for students who have taken Introductory Arabic I. The course will expand upon introductory material with a greater focus on grammatical structure and speaking skills, while increasing vocabulary. Students will continue to learn about the Arabic world through select readings and films. Prerequisites: Arabic 101 or permission by the instructor. Offered spring semester.

ML316: International Filmmakers (I)

How does film’s visual language bring us closer to a country’s culture?

This course examines the various representations of cultural traditions through the works of some of the most influential and thought-provoking international filmmakers. Directors include Chantal Akerman (Belgium), Jean-Pierre Bekolo (Cameroon), Icíar Bollaín (Spain), Nuri Bilge Ceylan (Turkey), Arturo Ripstein (Mexico), Michael Haneke (Austria), Chen Kaige (China), Abbas Kiarostami (Iran), Krzysztof Kieslowski (Poland), Akira Kurosawa (Japan), Lucrecia Martel (Argentina), Walter Salles (Brazil), Ousmane Sembène (Senegal), François Truffaut (France), Paolo Virzì (Italy), and others. Students interested in languages, foreign cultures and travel will gain a deeper understanding on the notion of “otherness” as seen through the works of award-winning filmmakers. Prerequisite: none. Offered every three years during the spring semester.