Courses

Computer Science Courses

CS 106 Computer Competency Fundamentals. One unit. All students must demonstrate computer literacy by a successful completion of this course or of a higher numbered computer science course, or by means of a test (obtaining a grade of C or better on either). This course examines the history of computers and their role in society and business. Fundamentals of PC operating systems, electronic mail processing, word processing, spreadsheets, database management, and internet. This is a course for non-computer science majors. Offered fall and spring semesters.*
CS 107 Computers: Fundamentals of Networking and Internet. One unit. This course focuses on the Internet, the world’s largest computer network. Topics include: basic principles of networking, Internet specifics, Internet browsers, remote computer usage — telnet, FTP, HTM language, and basics of JAVA programming. This is a course for non-computer science majors. Offered fall and spring semesters.*
CS 130 Introduction to Programming. One unit. 130 (or 132) and 142 constitute a two-semester sequence. Introduction to computer hardware, internal data representation, machine language, algorithms, and object-oriented and structured programming techniques. Basic control structures such as sequencing, branching and loops, as well as basic data structures such as integers, real numbers, characters, arrays and pointers are exemplified through various examples. Offered fall and spring semesters.*
CS 132 Object-Oriented Software Development for the World Wide Web. One unit. Design and analysis of programs with special emphasis on Object-Oriented Programming in a GUI environment. Classes and their relationships, object building, derivation, and inheritance are covered in depth using JAVA language. Class overloading, virtual functions, and polymorphic techniques are addressed as well. Incorporation of Applet programs written JAVA into Web applications are discussed in depth. This course involves several hands-on programming exercises. Offered spring and fall semesters.*
CS 142 Techniques of Programming. One unit. Continuation of 130 (or 132). Design and analysis of programs with special emphasis on Object-Oriented programming. Classes, functions, files and pointers are covered in depth. Topics such as information hiding, separate compilation, personal libraries and linking, as well as recursive techniques for control and data structures are discussed and implemented. Data encapsulation and information hiding are covered through various related projects that include using classes, their constructors and destructors. Class inheritance and derivations, class templates and overloading, virtual functions and polymorphisms are studied and examined through several hands-on projects. Prerequisite: CS 130 or 132. Offered spring semesters.*
CS 210 Internet and Database Research Techniques. One unit. Information management and research skills are essential for academic success. This course is designed to teach students basic computing skills as well as techniques for retrieving and evaluating information sources. Students will learn database management, networking, and internet skills while learning the fundamentals of the research process. Hands-on instruction will take place in the Horrmann Library Smart Lab. Upon successful completion of the course, designated students may apply to work in the library as Research Tutors to assist fellow students with research. Prerequisite: Successful completion of a Freshmen LC. Offered spring semester.
CS 212 Computer Graphics. One unit. Point and line drawing techniques, planar transformations, clipping, windowing, graphics packages, survey of graphics hardware, interactive graphics. Additional topics to be chosen from raster graphics, curves and surfaces, perspective, shading, hidden-surface elimination. Prerequisite: CS 142. Offered spring semester.*
CS 251 Data Structures. One unit. Arrays, stacks, queues, lists, trees, with applications to sorting and searching. Prerequisite: CS 142. Offered fall semester.*
CS 252 Assembler Language. One unit. Data representation, instruction type and format, branching, stacks, subroutines, procedures, assembling, linking, and macros. Prerequisite: CS 142. Offered spring semester.*
CS 322 Database Programming and Connectivity. One unit. This course in computer applications is the intermediate learning community in conjunction with Education 414: Methods and Curriculum Development for Inclusive Middle Childhood Education Grades 4–8 for students pursuing teacher preparation. This learning community integrates the various components of a middle school classroom such as literacy development, curriculum, classroom management, instructional strategies, and assessment with the techniques of designing Database Management Systems and interfacing them using Programming language JAVA for easy but controlled access from the World Wide Web. By taking these two courses simultaneously students will learn to build a Database Management System (DBMS) interfaced with the World Wide web as part of their middle school (4–8) interdisciplinary thematic unit. Developing their DBMS in conjunction with their thematic unit will be a semester-long project on which students will work in both learning community courses in a synchronized manner. During the latter part of the second half of the semester, students will work in a middle-level classroom setting during their practicum or field experience. At this time, students will have the opportunity to test out their DBMS with middle school students and evaluate the application and successful use of the DBMS that they have created. Prerequisites: ED 210, 326, 335, and admission into the teacher preparation program. Offered fall and spring semesters.*
CS/IS 325 Theory of Computation. One unit. Mathematical foundations of computer science. Formal languages: lexical, context-free, context-sensitive, type 0. Automata: Finite, Push-down, Linear-bound Turing machines, Chomsky’s hierarchy. Cross-listed with MA 325. Prerequisites: CS 130, MA 230 or instructor’s permission. Offered spring semester.
CS/IS 343 A Comparative Study of Contemporary Operating Systems. One unit. The material covered in the course will include in a comparative study, the features of UNIX, Windows® 2000, XP, Linux, and other current operating systems. Their respective environments and their accommodations of programming and networking related issues will be studied at length. Available file systems, tools, utilities, as well as debuggers and other supporting tools are discussed on a comparative basis. Prerequisite: CS 130 or 132. It is recommended that this course be completed in the sophomore or junior year.*
CS/IS 345 Database Systems. One unit. The material covered in the course will include: organization, storage, and retrieval of large bodies or relatively uniform or structured data, its physical storage, and useful data structure techniques for common database operations. The main part of the course covers the main models of data — the relational model, the network model, and the hierarchical model. Emphasis is on the relational model. Current Database Management Systems overview, as well as SQL Basics and Standards are covered as well. Perquisite: CS 142. Offered fall semester.*
CS 350 Microcomputer Fundamentals. One unit. Elements of microcomputer hardware and software. Basic digital electronics, microprocessor architecture, assembler language programming, introduction to interfacing. Prerequisite: CS 252. Offered fall semester.*
CS 351 Computer Architecture. One unit. Transistor circuits, gating, sequential circuits, CPU architectures and microprogramming, arithmetic algorithms, interrupts and I/O, basic design of main memory, microprocessor technology, and software considerations. Prerequisites: CS 251, 252. Offered spring semester.*
CS/IS 352 Computer Networks, Network Programming and Distributed Applications. One unit. This course focuses on design and implementation of network-distributed systems. Topics include: basic principles of networking, network topology and protocols, client/server applications using state machines and communication protocol techniques, and network programming utilizing JAVA facilities (socket interface, IDL, and remote method invocations) security. Prerequisite: CS 142. Offered spring semester.*
CS/IS 353 Computer Networks, LAN and WAN Technologies and Techniques. One unit. This course will examine the issues facing Local and Wide Area Network designers and administrators. While some of the technologies will be explored, most time will be spent investigating the techniques necessary to make them work. Students will become familiar with real networks exhibiting the decisions and problems inherent in modern LANs and WANs. Prerequisite: CS 142. Offered fall semester.*
CS 356 Programming Languages. One unit. A survey of current programming languages including the ALGOL family, PL/I, ADA, SNOBOL, and LISP. A formal specification of languages using grammars is presented. An introduction to recursive-descent parsing is also given. Prerequisites: CS 251, 252, 325. Offered fall semester.*
CS 397/IS Computer Science/Information Systems Experience. One unit. Internship at an approved computer science or information systems facility under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of the department. Offered fall and spring semesters.
CS/IS 400 Senior Reflective Tutorial. One unit. Students complete a field experience at an approved computer science facility or they execute a theoretical research project. An undergraduate thesis is presented. Prerequisites: senior standing and permission of the department. Offered spring semesters (with CS/IS 453 or CS/IS 550, capstone course).
CS/IS 422 Database Programming and Connectivity. One unit. This course focuses on current database programming techniques and methodologies. Topics include: database management systems overview, SQL, Basics and Standards, relational database primer, database drivers features and availability, ODBC, JDBC, database connectivity application programming interface, interfacing databases by applications generating database queries in SQL, integrating the techniques of database programming and interfacing into the World Wide Web. Prerequisite: CS 142. Offered fall semester.*
CS/IS 453 Operating Systems. Capstone course. One unit. History of operating systems; console operation, batch mode, multiprogramming, timesharing, and real-time systems. File management, job scheduling, memory management, device management, processes, semaphores and concurrent programming, virtual machines, and computer networks. Offered spring semester.*
CS 456 Compilers. One unit. Principles of design and implementation of modern compilers. Topics include lexical analysis, parsing, code generation, error detection and recovery, and optimization. Particular emphasis on LL and LR parsing and on automatic parser generators. Prerequisite: CS 325. Offered fall semester.*
CS 482 Numerical Analysis. One unit. Newton’s and other numerical methods, operators, finite differences, numerical integration, numerical solution of differential equations, and an introduction to computer arithmetic. Cross-listed with MA 482. Prerequisites: CS 130 and MA 122. Offered fall semester of odd-numbered years.
CS/IS 497 Computer Science/Information Systems Experience. Two units. Internship at an approved computer science or information systems facility under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of the department. Offered fall and spring semesters.
CS/IS 550 Electronic Commerce. Capstone course. One unit. This course is designed to provide students with a broad overview of the electronic commerce environment and key issues involved in its implementation. Students are going to learn how to build the front-end, middleware, and backend components that drive electronic commerce. Offered spring semester.*
CS/IS 591 Special Topics. One unit. Topics selected according to student interest. This course will provide students with an opportunity to study a particular area related to computers that may not be provided in the regular offerings, or to continue their study beyond an existing course offering. Prerequisite: permission of the department. Offered periodically; consult department chair.
CS/IS 593 Independent Study. One unit. An opportunity for an advanced student to work independently, under the direction of a faculty member, on some topic not included in the regular offerings. Prerequisite: permission of the department.
CS/IS 595 Seminar. One unit. Attendance is required at every meeting; at least one paper must be presented by each student. This course may be repeated once for credit with permission of the department. Prerequisites: junior standing and permission of the department. Offered periodically; consult department chair.
* A non-refundable laboratory fee is required
Information Systems Courses
352 Computer Networks, Network Programming and Distributed Applications. This course focuses on design and implementation of network-distributed systems. Topics include: basic principles of networking, network topology and protocols, client/server applications using state machines and communication protocol techniques, and network programming utilizing JAVA facilities (socket interface, IDL and remote method invocations) security. Prerequisite: Computer Science 251. Offered spring semester.*
353 Computer Networks, LAN and WAN Technologies and Techniques. This course will examine the issues facing Local and Wide Area Network designers and administrators. While some of the technologies will be explored, most time will be spent investigating the techniques necessary to make them work. Students will become familiar with real networks exhibiting the decisions and problems inherent in modern LANs and WANs. Prerequisite: Computer Science 142. Offered fall semester.*
397 Information Systems Experience Work-study at an approved computer science facility under the supervision of a faculty member. Offered fall and spring semesters.
400 Senior Reflective Tutorial Students complete a field experience at an approved information systems facility or they execute a theoretical research project. An undergraduate thesis is presented. Prerequisites: Computer Science 251, 252. Offered and spring (with Information Systems 550, capstone course) semesters.
453 Operating Systems. History of operating systems; console operation, batch mode, multiprogramming, timesharing, and real-time systems. File management, job scheduling, memory management, device management, processes, semaphores and concurrent programming, virtual machines, and computer networks. Prerequisites: Mathematics 121 or 124 and Computer Science 251, 252. Offered fall semester.*
497 Information Systems Experience. Work-study at an approved information systems facility under the supervision of a faculty member. Offered fall and spring semesters.
522 Database Programming and Connectivity. This course focuses on current database programming techniques and methodologies. Topics include: Database Management Systems Overview, SQL, Basics and Standards, Relational Database Primer, Database Drivers Features and Availability, ODBC, JDBC, Database Connectivity Application Programming Interface, Interfacing Databases by Applications Generating Database Queries in SQL, Integrating the Techniques of Database Programming and Interfacing into the WWW. Prerequisite: Computer Science 142. Offered fall semester.*
550 Electronic Commerce. Capstone course. This course is designed to provide students with a broad overview of the electronic commerce environment and key issues involved in its implementation. Students are going to learn how to build the front-end, middleware, and back-end components that drive electronic commerce. Prerequisites: Information Systems 522 or permission of instructor. Offered spring semester.*
591 Special Topics. Topics selected according to student interest. This course will provide students with an opportunity to study a particular area related to computers that may not be provided in the regular offerings, or to continue their study beyond an existing course offering. Prerequisite: permission of the department. Offered periodically; consult department chair.
593 Independent Study. An opportunity for an advanced student to work independently, under the direction of a faculty member, on some topic not included in the regular offerings. Prerequisite: permission of the department.
595 Seminar. Attendance is required at every meeting; at least one paper must be presented by each student. This course may be repeated once for credit with permission of the department. Prerequisites: junior standing and permission of the department. Offered periodically; consult department chair.
* A nonrefundable laboratory fee is required.
Mathematics Courses

MA 108 Statistics for Business. One unit. The basic techniques of descriptive and sampling statistics including regression, normal and t-distributions, hypothesis testing, estimation, and trend analysis. Applications to economics and business. Credit will not be given for both MA 108 and 109. Offered fall and spring semesters.
 MA 109 Elementary Statistics. One unit. The basic techniques of descriptive and sampling statistics including regression, normal and t-distributions, hypothesis testing, estimation, including regression, normal and t-distributions, hypothesis testing, estimation, F-distributions, and analysis of variance. Applications to the natural and social sciences. Credit will not be given for both MA 108 and 109. Offered fall and spring semesters.
 MA 110 Mathematical Concepts and Applications. One unit. This course is a required course for all non-mathematics/science majors (see MA 119 for math, science, and business majors). It is designed to be a general overview of selected mathematical concepts with strong liberal arts roots and with useful everyday life applications. Topics include logic, real numbers, equations, geometry, combinatorics, probability, and statistics. This course may be waived if a higher-level math course is taken. Offered fall and spring semesters.
 MA 119 Finite Mathematics. One unit. Designed primarily for students in math, science, and business, as an alternative to MA 110. This course builds algebraic skills while emphasizing applications, modeling, and decision-making problems in the social sciences, business, natural sciences, and other areas. Introduces the student to the basic ideas of logic, set theory, combinatorics, probability, vectors, matrices, and linear programming. Offered fall and spring semesters.
 MA 121 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I. One unit. MA 121, 122, and 223 constitute a three-term sequence. MA 121 is an introduction to calculus: derivatives and integrals of algebraic and trigonometric functions of one variable, with applications. Offered fall and spring semesters.
 MA 122 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II. One unit. Continuation of MA 121. Techniques and applications of integration of functions of one variable: L’Hopital’s rule, improper integrals, sequences and series, polar coordinates, and conic sections. Prerequisite: MA 121. Offered fall semester. Periodically offered spring semester, consult department chair.
 MA 124 Applied Calculus. One unit. A review of linear and quadratic equations, an introduction to polynomial functions, a study of derivatives, logarithmic and exponential functions, and basic integration, with applications to business, economics, social sciences, and life sciences. Applications include optimization of cost, revenue and profit functions, curve sketching, and surplus calculations. This is a course for non-mathematics majors. Prerequisite: MA 108 or 109 or 110 or permission of instructor. Offered fall and spring semesters.
 MA 223 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III. One unit. Continuation of MA 122. Vectors, functions of more than one variable, partial differentiation, multiple integration. Prerequisites: MA 121, 122. Offered spring semester. Periodically offered fall semester, consult department chair.
MA 230 Discrete Mathematics. One unit. Logic and proof techniques, set theory, algorithms, recurrence relations, graph theory, trees. Prerequisite: MA 121 or permission of instructor. Offered fall semester. Periodically offered spring semester, consult department chair.
 MA 232 Linear Algebra. One unit. Vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices, determinants and solutions of linear systems, characteristic values and vectors, Cayley-Hamilton theorem, and inner product spaces. Prerequisite: MA 121 or 124. Offered fall semester.
 MA 233 Differential Equations. One unit. Ordinary differential equations of the first and second order, existence and uniqueness of solutions, linear differential equations, power series solutions, Laplace transforms, with applications to geometry and physics. Prerequisite: MA 122. Offered spring semester.
 MA 316 Operations Research. One unit. Mathematical models, constraints, the simplex method, duality, and the transportation problem. Other topics to be chosen from game theory and dynamic programming. Prerequisite: MA 232. Offered spring semester of even-numbered years.
 MA 321 Advanced Calculus. One unit. Capstone course. A thorough discussion of the real number system; topology of the real line, continuous functions, uniform convergence. Additional topics from theory of integration and multivariate calculus. Offered spring semester of odd-numbered years.
 MA 322 Complex Variables. One unit. Complex numbers, analytic functions, conformal mapping, Taylor and Laurent series, contour integration, and residues. Prerequisite: MA 223. Offered fall semester of even-numbered years.
 MA 325 Theory of Computation. One unit. Mathematical foundations of computer science. Formal languages: lexical, context-free, context-sensitive, type 0. Automata: Finite, Pushdown, Linear-bound Turing machines, Chomsky’s hierarchy. Cross-listed with CS/IS 325. Prerequisites: CS 130 and MA 230 or instructor’s permission. Offered spring semesters.
 MA 373 Probability. One unit. Capstone course. Basic laws of probability, discrete and continuous random variables, expectations, and the Central Limit Theorem. Offered spring semester of even-numbered years.
 MA 397 Mathematics Experience. One unit. Internship at an approved internship facility under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of the department. Offered fall and spring semesters.
 MA 400 Senior Reflective Tutorial. One unit. Students complete a field experience at an approved facility or they execute a theoretical research project. An undergraduate thesis is presented. Offered spring semester with MA 421, MA 431, MA 321, or MA 373, capstone course.
 MA 421 Topology. One unit. Capstone course. Topological spaces and topological equivalence, the topology of the real line, metric spaces, compact spaces, connected spaces, Hausdorff spaces, and the separation axioms. Offered spring semester, even-numbered years.
 MA 431 Abstract Algebra. One unit. Capstone course. Groups, rings, integral domains, fields. Offered fall semester of even-numbered years.
 MA 433 Theory of Numbers. One unit. Divisibility, congruence, theorems of Wilson and Fermat, linear diophantine equations, Pell’s equation, and the law of quadratic reciprocity. Prerequisite: MA 230. Offered spring semester, odd-numbered  years.
 MA 441 Modern Geometry. One unit. An introduction to modern geometry through a unified treatment of foundations; Euclidean geometry, projective and other non-Euclidean geometries. Offered fall semester, odd-numbered years.
 MA 451 History of Mathematical Thought. One unit. A survey of the development of mathematics from ancient to modern times. Prerequisite: junior standing.
 MA 482 Numerical Analysis. One unit. Newton’s and other numerical methods, operators, finite differences, numerical integration, numerical solution of differential equations, and an introduction to computer arithmetic. Prerequisites: CS 130 and MA 122. Cross-listed with CS 482. Offered fall semester, odd-numbered years.
 MA 497 Mathematics Experience. Two units. Internship at an approved facility under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of the department. Offered fall and spring semesters.
 MA 591 Special Topics. One unit. Topics selected according to student interest. This course will provide students with an opportunity to study a particular field of their mathematical interest that may not be provided in the regular offerings or to continue their study beyond an existing course offering. Prerequisite: permission of the department. Offered periodically; consult department chair.
 MA 593 Independent Study. One unit. An opportunity for an advanced student to work independently, under the direction of a faculty member, on some topic not included in the regular offerings. Prerequisite: permission of the department.
 MA 595 Seminar One unit. Attendance is required at every meeting; each student must present at least one paper. This course may be repeated once for credit with permission of the department. Prerequisites: junior standing and permission of the department. Offered periodically; consult department chair.
 
*A non-refundable laboratory fee is required.