Descriptions of Intermediate Learning Communities

You may fulfill the Intermediate Learning Community through a two-course ILC, a one-course (one-unit, team-taught) ILC, or by completing a semester or summer session abroad in a Wagner-approved program where you earn a grade of C or higher in two concurrent courses. Be sure to plan ahead with your advisor to fulfill this requirement on time. Students are welcome to take multiple ILCs.


Spring 2017 ILCs

The following Intermediate Learning Communities have been planned for Spring 2017. The list will be updated as plans are finalized for Spring 2017.

Students should select ILCs that do not include any courses they have already taken. For example, a student who has previously taken SPC 103 should not try to register for the ILC combining a unit of SPC 103 with a unit of FI 201.

ILC 1: Washington, DC Internship — GOV 395 & GOV 396

This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Washington, DC. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Washington, DC (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor.


GOV 395-ILC Washington Internship — Kraus

and

GOV 396-ILC Dynamics of American Government — Kraus

ILC 2: Albany Internship — GOV 390 & GOV 391

This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Albany, NY. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Albany, NY (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor.


GOV 390-ILC New York State Gov. & Politics — Kraus

and

GOV 391-ILC New York Legislature Internship — Kraus

ILC 3: Two-Course ILC for Nursing Majors: Nutritional Strategies: Bacteria to Humans — MI 200 & NR 224

This learning community, intended for Nursing majors, looks at the cellular nutrition of eukaryotes (humans) vs. the nutrition of prokaryotes (bacteria). It also covers the similarities and differences in the structure, function and role of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins and trace elements in humans and bacteria.  Finally, it looks at the immunological aspects of nutrition across the human life span compared to the immunological aspects in disease prevention.


MI 200-ILC Microbiology — Bobbitt


MI 200L Microbiology Lab — Select any section of MI 200L


NR 224-ILC Nutrition & Health — Aurelus

ILC 4: Two-Course ILC: Public Speaking for Business — FI 201 & SPC 103

In addition to addressing the apprehension of public speaking, this ILC is an ideal addition for the business student.  Utilizing principles of finance concepts, participants will learn how to effectively present financial information about their company to various stakeholders groups. Students learn skills that allow them to speak informatively, persuasively, and in groups. Through these techniques, students cultivate personal style that results in more powerful presentations, which is a skill that is important to one’s academic and professional advancement.


FI 201-ILC Principles of Finance — Tully — Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:00–2:30 pm

This course has prerequisites. Please check the Bulletin for details.


SPC 103-ILC Public Speaking — Fenley — Mondays & Wednesdays 1:00–2:30 pm

ILC 5: Two-Course ILC — BU 211(I) & EN 111(W)(I)

BU 211-ILC International Business (I) — Carter

This course has prerequisite of EC 101 or EC 102.


EN 111(W)-ILC World Literature — Arant

One-Course, One-Unit Team-Taught ILCs for Fall 2016

A team-taught ILC is a single-unit course taught by instructors from two different disciplines. A team-taught ILC is a cross-listed course that fulfills the ILC requirement. Students who enroll in a team-taught ILC will earn only one unit and therefore must choose to earn credit for one of the two courses. For example, a team-taught ILC incorporating SPC 252 and SO 300 allows the student to earn one unit of Speech or one unit of Sociology, not both. If a student has already taken either course that is cross-listed in a team-taught ILC, the student may not register for the ILC. Students will not be able to earn a unit for a course that is cross-listed with a course they have already taken. This applies whether or not the previous course was a stand-alone course or was cross-listed in a team-taught ILC. For example, because SPC 252 is cross-listed with SO 300, a student who has previously taken SPC 252 or SPC 252-ILC may not earn a unit for taking SO 300-ILC.

Team-Taught ILC: How to Marry a Millionaire: Game Theory and the Novels of Jane Austen — EC 291 or EN 291

Should a woman delay in accepting her favorite suitor?  What do beauty contests and the stock market have in common? What is the battle of the sexes? They all involve strategic thinking. This course will introduce some basic ideas from game theory, a multifaceted tool that helps analyze strategic behavior, and use its insights to read Jane Austen’s novels of courtship, such as Pride and Prejudice.  In addition, we will search for strategic reasoning in folk tales, films, and international affairs.

No previous knowledge of economics, game theory, or Jane Austen is necessary, but enthusiasm for playing games is encouraged!

Dr. Dasgupta (Economics) and Dr. Schotter (English)


Fall 2016 ILCs

The following Intermediate Learning Communities are offered for Fall 2016. Students should select ILCs that do not include any courses they have already taken. For example, a student who has previously taken SPC 103 should not try to register for the ILC combining a unit of SPC 103 with a unit of FI 201.

Two-Course ILCs for Fall 2016

ILC 1: Washington, DC Internship — GOV 395 & GOV 396

This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Washington, DC. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Washington, DC (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor.


GOV 395-ILC Washington Internship — Kraus

GOV 396-ILC Dynamics of American Government — Kraus

ILC 2: Nutritional Strategies: Bacteria to Humans — MI 200 & NR 224

This learning community, intended for Nursing majors, looks at the cellular nutrition of eukaryotes (humans) vs. the nutrition of prokaryotes (bacteria). It also covers the similarities and differences in the structure, function and role of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins and trace elements in humans and bacteria.  Finally, it looks at the immunological aspects of nutrition across the human life span compared to the immunological aspects in disease prevention.


MI 200-ILC Microbiology — Bobbitt — Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00–2:30 pm


MI 200L Microbiology Lab — Select any section of MI 200L


NR 224-ILC Nutrition & Health — Fridays 9:00 am–12:00 noon

ILC 3: Public Speaking for Business — FI 201 & SPC 103

In addition to addressing the apprehension of public speaking, this ILC is an ideal addition for the business student.  Utilizing principles of finance concepts, participants will learn how to effectively present financial information about their company to various stakeholders groups. Students learn skills that allow them to speak informatively, persuasively, and in groups. Through these techniques, students cultivate personal style that results in more powerful presentations, which is a skill that is important to one’s academic and professional advancement.


FI 201-ILC Principles of Finance — Tully — Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:00–2:30 pm

This course has prerequisites. Please check the Bulletin for details.


SPC 103-ILC Public Speaking — Fenley — Mondays & Wednesdays 1:00–2:30 pm

ILC 4: The Mind in Crisis — PS 212 & PH 205

Philosophers and psychologists have raised certain basic questions about our mental life; and, when entertained, the questions have perplexed them throughout their histories.  This ILC explores some of these questions: Does consciousness exist?  What is the relation between mind and our physical organism?  Is there a place for mind in a scientific explanation of the cosmos?  What is the role of the unconscious?  The ILC also explores questions about the workings of mind in our everyday life and in psychopathology. All the questions are pursued with reference both to classical and modern thinkers.

PS 212-ILC Psychopathology — Groth — Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00–2:30

PH 205-ILC Philosophy of Mind — Danisi — Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:20–12:50

ILC 5: Mathematics and the Universe in Which We Live — AS 105 & MA 119

The stars of the night sky have attracted attention and aroused curiosity since the dawn of time. At first superstition and folklore were used to explain various astronomical phenomena. This gradually gave way and humankind began to discover that there was a certain order to the heavens which could be explained with the help of an important tool—mathematics. Hence, the goal of this learning community will be, not only to educate students in mathematics and astronomy, but more importantly to show them how to use basic mathematical concepts to unlock the mysteries of the Universe.

AS105-ILC Astronomy: The Solar System — Falabella — Tuesdays & Thursdays 11:20–12:50

Lab for AS105 is optional. Any section of the lab may be taken.

MA119-ILC Finite Mathematics — Lombardo — Tuesdays & Thursdays 6:00–7:30 pm

One-Course, One-Unit Team-Taught ILCs for Fall 2016

A team-taught ILC is a single-unit course taught by instructors from two different disciplines. A team-taught ILC is a cross-listed course that fulfills the ILC requirement. Students who enroll in a team-taught ILC will earn only one unit and therefore must choose to earn credit for one of the two courses. For example, a team-taught ILC incorporating SPC 252 and SO 300 allows the student to earn one unit of Speech or one unit of Sociology, not both. If a student has already taken either course that is cross-listed in a team-taught ILC, the student may not register for the ILC. Students will not be able to earn a unit for a course that is cross-listed with a course they have already taken. This applies whether or not the previous course was a stand-alone course or was cross-listed in a team-taught ILC. For example, because SPC 252 is cross-listed with SO 300, a student who has previously taken SPC 252 or SPC 252-ILC may not earn a unit for taking SO 300-ILC.

ILC 6: Team-Taught ILC: Crime, Courts and the Media — JR 291 or SO 270

Crime is news, and today’s focus on digital journalism pressures reporters to deliver news about crime as soon as it happens, in real-time. Crime reporters need a solid understanding of the criminal process and court systems at the county, state and federal levels. They must know how to avoid convicting a defendant with their choice of words as they cover a trial, when to withhold details about victims of sensitive crimes, and how to determine if images of crime scenes are too graphic to post or publish. The course will also explore the public’s threshold for crime news and how covering crime can create panic or minimize harm.

JR 291: Covering Crime and the Courts — Regan — Tuesdays 6:00–9:00 pm

or

SO 270: Criminal Procedure — Martin — Tuesdays 6:00–9:00 pm

ILC 7: Team-Taught ILC: Constitutional Law, Religious Liberty, and Free Speech — GOV 316 or SO 291

This ILC focuses broadly on the study of constitutional law, with a special emphasis on the First Amendment’s Free Exercise, Establishment, and Free Speech clauses. In doing so, the following areas of constitutional thought and practice will be analyzed: the powers of the president, Congress, and the courts; their interrelationships; federalism; the rights of defendants in criminal cases; the rights of racial and sexual minorities; government aid to religious schools; religious symbols on public grounds; government endorsement of religion; limits of religious freedom; “high” and “low” value speech; prior restraint; and various “tests” and “standards” involved in free speech jurisprudence, including the “clear and present danger” test; the “actual malice” standard; and the “imminent lawless action” test.

GOV 316: Constitutional Law — Ghosh — Mondays 6:00–9:00 pm

or

SO 291: Special Topics: Law & Religion in American Society — Pinto — Mondays 6:00–9:00 pm

ILC 8: Honors Team-Taught ILC: The Role of Media in Crisis Situations — SO 291 or FM 291

This honors course will examine the role the media play in crisis situations.   It will examine the public responsibility of the media in public emergences, as well as the moral and ethical limits in how the media report and interpret such situations.  Case studies of the role the media have played in recent emergency situations will be examined to consider whether the media meet their professional and ethical obligations.  Particular attention will be given to cross-national comparisons between the role of media in crisis situations in the United States and Israel. Wagner students work with Hadassah Academic College (Jerusalem) students to draft joint projects comparing media response to crisis situations.


SO 291-ILC (Honors) Special Topics: The Role of the Media in Crisis Situations — Esser — Tuesdays 9:40-12:50

or

FM 291-ILC (Honors) Special Topics: The Role of the Media in Crisis Situations — Greenwald — Tuesdays 9:40-12:50


Tentative Plans for ILCs in Future Semesters

To help students make decisions regarding ILCs, below is a partial list of ILCs tentatively planned.

Washington, DC Internship — GOV 395 & GOV 396 (Every fall and spring semester)

This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Washington, DC. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Washington, DC (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor.


GOV 395-ILC Washington Internship — Kraus

GOV 396-ILC Dynamics of American Government — Kraus

Albany Internship — GOV 390 & GOV 391 (Every spring semester)

This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Albany, NY. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Albany, NY (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor.


GOV 390-ILC New York State Gov. & Politics — Kraus

GOV 391-ILC New York Legislature Internship — Kraus

Issues in Ethics and Medicine — BI 219 and PH 202 (Spring 2017)

This ILC will pursue an interdisciplinary study of ethics, genetic engineering, biotechnology, and developmental biology. We will use our knowledge of these disciplines to bear upon central issues and practices in modern medicine. Topics may include: Suicide and euthanasia; abortion and assisted reproduction; the status and development of the human embryo and of stem cells; cloning and surrogacy; as well as gene therapy and animal experimentation.

BI 219-ILC — Gene Expression and Development — Cook This course has a prerequisite. Please check the Bulletin for details.

BI 219L  — Laboratory for Gene Expression and Development

PH 202-ILC — Medical Ethics — Danisi

ILCs from Previous Semesters

 

Spring 2016 ILCs

Two-Unit ILCs for Spring 2016 ILC 1: Washington Internship — GOV 395 & GOV 396 This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Washington, DC. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Washington, DC (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor. GOV 395-ILC Washington Internship — Kraus GOV 396-ILC Dynamics of American Government — Kraus


ILC 2: Albany Internship — GOV 390 & GOV 391 This learning community exposes students to the workings of the governmental and political processes in Albany, NY. Through internship assignments, classroom instruction, and directed readings and research, students will develop a greater appreciation of the policy-making process. The courses are offered in Albany, NY (each course is a 2-unit course), and registration is by permission of the instructor. GOV 390-ILC New York State Gov. & Politics — Kraus GOV 391-ILC New York Legislature Internship — Kraus


ILC 3: Nutritional Strategies: Bacteria to Humans — MI 200 & NR 224 This learning community, intended for Nursing majors, looks at the cellular nutrition of eukaryotes (humans) vs. the nutrition of prokaryotes (bacteria). It also covers the similarities and differences in the structure, function and role of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins and trace elements in humans and bacteria.  Finally, it looks at the immunological aspects of nutrition across the human life span compared to the immunological aspects in disease prevention. MI 200-ILC Microbiology — Bobbit — Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00–2:30 MI 200L Microbiology Lab — Select any section of MI 200L NR 224-ILC Nutrition & Health — Thursdays 6:00–9:00


ILC 4: Public Speaking for Business — FI 201 & SPC 103 In addition to addressing the apprehension of public speaking, this ILC is an ideal addition for the business student.  Utilizing principles of finance concepts, participants will learn how to effectively present financial information about their company to various stakeholders groups. Students learn skills that allow them to speak informatively, persuasively, and in groups. Through these techniques, students cultivate personal style that results in more powerful presentations, which is a skill that is important to one’s academic and professional advancement. FI 201-ILC Principles of Finance — Tully — Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:00-2:30 pm This course has prerequisites. Please check the Bulletin for details. SPC 103-ILC Public Speaking — Fenley — Mondays & Wednesdays 1:00-2:30 pm


ILC 5: Art and Advertising in the Music Business — AA 421 & AR 203 This intermediate learning community will explore the roles of promotion, marketing and distribution of music.  Topics to be explored include the roles of personal managers, agents, and attorneys.  The negotiation and structure of the record deal will be discussed, along with issues relating to music publishing agreement, merchandising and the use of music in films.  Using these principles of promotion, students will create websites that feature specific performers.  Students will consider color, type and image content and how these visual concepts promote artists in the music industry.


ILC 6: American Ecologies Past & Present — AN 235 (D) & BI 110 plus Lab This intermediate learning community will examine the nature of human environment interactions from both biological and anthropological perspectives. In the anthropology course we will reconstruct Native American cultures and economies from the earliest colonization of North America through the early period of European contact. Throughout the course we will focus on how human cultural, social, and political activities shaped and were shaped by the environment. In the environmental biology course we will examine how Earth’s biological systems function and interact with abiotic ecosystem components like climate and geology, and how ecological services benefit human societies and economies. We will explore the consequences of environmental degradation and relationships between environmental issues and human culture, technology, economics, and politics. The courses included will satisfy the following General Education Requirements: a science, a laboratory experience, a social science, and a diversity course.


ILC 7: Remembering Colonialism and Slavery, Imagining the Future of Africa — EN 291 (W) and HI 242 (I) Historians, artists, and filmmakers have examined the past in order to imagine an alternative way forward. This class will study the different ways that Americans, Africans, Caribbeans, and Europeans have raised questions about the past in order to make sense of their present and to work toward a better future. EN 291(W)-ILC Topics in World Cultures and Cinema: Sankofa — Thomas — Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:40–4:10 HI 242-ILC Modern Africa: History, Memory, and the Bitter Legacy of Slavery and Colonialism (I) — Traoré — Mondays and Wednesdays 2:40–4:10 EN 291 (W) Topics in World Cultures and Cinema: Sankofa Dr. Steven Thomas Tuesdays & Thursdays 2:40–4:10 The word “Sankofa” in the Akan language of Ghana means “reach back and get it.” Symbolized by a bird with its head turned around to take an egg off its back, the heart-shaped image suggests a metaphor for the importance of having an honest historical consciousness in order to fly forward. Sometimes it is translated as, “it is not wrong to go back for that which you have forgotten.” The symbol has been adopted by New York City’s African Burial Ground National Monument and by Washington D.C.’s Museum of African American History and Culture. It is also the title of one of the most controversial dramatic movies about the memory of slave revolt by the Ethiopian-American director Haile Gerima. This class will feature films from around the world that aim to think about the relationship between past, present, and future. We will watch films from Italy, England, the Netherlands, Curaçao, Cuba, Nigeria, Senegal, and other countries in the world, as well as the United States of America, that investigate the history of Africa’s connection to Europe, North America, and the Caribbean. We will watch films about several topics, including recent movies about the transatlantic slave trade, about anti-colonialist struggle in the 1960s and 70s, and the about the recent media arts movement called “Afro-Futurism.” HI 242 (I) Modern Africa: History, Memory, and the Bitter Legacy of Slavery and Colonialism Dr. Ousmane Traore Mondays & Wednesdays 2:40–4:10 Struggles for independences, which most African states achieved in the 1960s, and the processes of democratization that followed the end of the Cold War in the late 1980s, provided people of slave ancestry with opportunities to take part in civic debates on citizenship, history and memory, political participation, and the role of the state. The Atlantic Slave Trade and the stigma of European colonialism today manifest in the resentment slave descendants feel about enduring discrimination and in their commitment to keep the memory of their enslaved ancestors alive by not changing their surnames to hide their origins. When memories are publicly articulated in the form of historical narratives, oral traditions or films, remembering becomes a highly selective process that scholars of slavery must confront. This course raises questions such as “where are the slaves’ voices?” and aims at disentangling memory and history. The course will offer students a two-fold opportunity: to gain a better understanding of the history of Africa and the Atlantic World; and to become film critics with an understanding that films, too, are historical artifacts of society. We will explore significant moments in the trans-Atlantic evolution of the cinematic medium from the 1960s to the present. The course will historically examine the television mini-series on slavery Kunta Kinte (Roots of Alex Haley) as well as films like Ceddo (Ousmane Sembène), as well as changing patterns of popular entertainment and the conditions for film production. What social conditions in Europe, America, Asia, the Middle East, and Africa facilitate the creation of films, which pass down the history of the Atlantic Slave Trade or Colonialism to our collective memory? All films will be examined as historical artifacts of their societies, with particular attention to the voices of slaves themselves, but also to colonialism, technologies, sexuality, and ethnic identities. Through a study of several major 20th century films, their directors and audiences, their historical and memorial context and their analysis by film critics, students will acquire the tools necessary to better understand the relationship between film, history, and memory and become more informed viewers of contemporary films on slavery and Atlantic Slave Trade. This course on African history is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the political, economic, and social changes in Africa after the arrival of Europeans on the continent. We will focus on the Pre-colonial, Colonial, and Post-Colonial periods and rethink the African power of decision-making and what 
accommodation means in the history of Empire. We will analyze the socio-political impacts of the Berlin Conference in present-day
 Africa in terms of governance and ethnic conflicts. Also under 
the same lens, we will bring into sharper focus the Cold War, the 
rise of strongmen, development issues, foreign aid, and democratization processes in Africa. Specifically, we will look 
at the uprisings in the Maghreb and in locations in
 sub-Saharan Africa, examining the birth of a strong, new civil
society, and also the ambiguous support of Western Powers.


ILC 8: Social Media and the Law: The Need to Know vs. the Right to Know — JR 261 (W) and SO 270 In today’s world of social media and 24 hour news updates, people are constantly bombarded with the latest, most up-to-date news. Some people would argue that the news media has gone too far and started to invade into personal space. The media believes that the public has the “right to know.”  Where should one draw the line between the need to know vs. the right to be left alone? This ILC will look to examine these issues and challenge the student to think critically about these important subjects in today’s society.


SO 270-ILC Criminal Procedure — Martin — Mondays and Wednesdays 6:00–7:30 pm JR 261-ILC Reporting in the New Age of Journalism (W) — Reagan — Mondays and Wednesdays 7:31–9:00 pm JR 261 is a writing-intensive course.


ILC 9: Honors ILC: Blues, Boycotts and the Journey towards the Promised Land — MU 209 (D) & GOV 268 This is an honors ILC. The pain, struggle, resilience and triumphs of African Americans are documented in many ways. During slavery a rich, imaginative oral tradition thrived. Black influence on popular and dance music became more and more apparent and the Negro Spiritual and Ragtime attracted much admiration. Post-civil war suffering produced the Blues. Blues and Ragtime blended, were influenced by literate whites and Creoles, and Jazz began. Meanwhile, Black leadership emerged anew and established itself.  A tradition of uniquely African American political thought gave strength and hope to African Americans even as it confronted the dominant culture, as Blacks sought to overcome cultural and systemic prejudice and struggled for equality. Literate thinkers, preachers and activists built on oral traditions and created a body of compelling literature. Blues and Jazz became “the American soundtrack,” broke down racial barriers and evolved into some of the most sophisticated improvisatory art forms the world has ever known. The power struggle of American Blacks has influenced and inspired liberation movements all over the world. MU 209-ILC  The History of Blues and Jazz (D) (H) — Wesby — MWF 11:20–12:20 GOV 268-ILC African-American Political Thought (H) — Moynagh — TR 11:20–12:50


One-Course, One-Unit Team-Taught ILCs for Spring 2016 A team-taught ILC is a single-unit course taught by instructors from two different disciplines. A team-taught ILC is a cross-listed course that fulfills the ILC requirement. Students who enroll in a team-taught ILC will earn only one unit and therefore must choose to earn credit for one of the two courses. For example, a team-taught ILC incorporating SPC 252 and SO 300 allows the student to earn one unit of Speech or one unit of Sociology, not both. If a student has already taken either course that is cross-listed in a team-taught ILC, the student may not register for the ILC. Students will not be able to earn a unit for a course that is cross-listed with a course they have already taken. This applies whether or not the previous course was a stand-alone course or was cross-listed in a team-taught ILC. For example, because SPC 252 is cross-listed with SO 300, a student who has previously taken SPC 252 or SPC 252-ILC may not earn a unit for taking SO 300-ILC.


ILC 10: Team-Taught: Civil Liberties, Human Rights, and Disability Studies — MDS 217 (D) or GOV 317 (D) Team-taught ILC: Civil Liberties, Human Rights, and Disability Studies: This team-taught ILC focuses broadly on civil liberties and human rights in the United States as well as, more narrowly, the contemporary disability rights movement and its achievements. The United States prides itself as being a free country. But to what extent is freedom routinely denied to individual citizens in the US? Who suffers most egregiously from these denials? In this course we will examine these denials of rights and liberties to various marginal groups including but not limited to people living with disabilities. In doing so, we will use an interdisciplinary lens that combines the interrelated fields of constitutional law, politics, sociology, and disability studies. Throughout the course, we will explore the tensions that exist between broadly affirmed values in the US, such as liberty and equality. An experiential component will be built into the course in which Wagner students will work closely with a person with an intellectual disability with the goal of increasing access or equity for people with disabilities at the community, local, state, or national levels. MDS 217-ILC Special Topics: Disability Rights Movement: How Society & the Law Impact the Lives of People with Disabilities (D) — Gordon — Mondays and Wednesdays 1:00–2:30 GOV 317-ILC Civil Liberties and Human Rights (D) — Ghosh — Mondays and Wednesdays 1:00–2:30 NOTE: Students must elect to register for the course in Multidisciplinary Studies or in Government and Politics. Choose carefully, as this course will only count toward the discipline for which you enroll. Completion of this single course satisfies the ILC requirement. Students who have previously taken this ILC (regardless of whether it is listed as MDS 291-ILC, SO 291-ILC, or GOV 317-ILC on a transcript) may not take this ILC again. Students who take this ILC may not take MDS 217 or GOV 317 in a future semester.


ILC 11: Team-Taught: Getting Away With Murder — CH 291 or SO 291 This course studies the crimes and all the trappings of the  NYPD’s Major Case Squad. Students will learn different crimes (art theft, burglary, kidnapping, larceny) including the elements of each crime and potential defenses for trial. The investigative side of the Squad will also be studied, such as exploring a crime scene, preparing a search warrant, and dealing with media inquiries. The chemistry portion of the course focuses on the scientific methods employed by forensic chemists for crime scene investigation. Topics covered will include physical evidence recognition and collection, DNA and fingerprint analysis, sample preservation, and crime scene reconstruction. This course is recommended for students who are not majoring in a science.


CH 291-ILC Special Topics: Crime Scene Investigation — Ciavarella — Tuesdays 6:00–9:00 pm SO 291-ILC Special Topics: Crime Scene Investigation: Major Case Squad — Pinto — Tuesdays 6:00–9:00 pm NOTE: Students must elect to register for the course in Chemistry or Sociology. Choose carefully, as this course will only count toward the discipline for which you enroll. Completion of this single course satisfies the ILC requirement. Students who have previously taken this ILC (whether it is listed as CH 291-ILC or SO 291-ILC) may not take this ILC again.


ILC 12: Team-Taught: Holocaust Drama on Stage and in Media — TH 103 or HI 291 How have the atrocities of the Holocaust and its long-term consequences been represented on stage and screen?  No one work or group of works can hope to encompass the range of meanings and implications of the brutality and inhumanity of those years, but individual works can offer unexpected perspectives and insights into the conditions that made them possible, some of what those who suffered or resisted experienced, and the psychological and political reverberations that continue to this day.  The scripts and videos of plays, television dramas and films to be viewed and analyzed will include:  Cabaret,  The Diary of Anne Frank and its reinterpretation in the play  Compulsion, Ghetto, Playing for Time (TV movie set in Auschwitz), Incident at Vichy (play set in France), Korczak and the Children (set in the Warsaw ghetto), A Shayna Maidel, The Action Against Sol Schumann, and The Deputy.  Students will have opportunities to meet creative contributors (actors, writers, directors) to several of these works.  The ILC will involve elements of script analysis and public performance. Open to all students regardless of major. TH 103-ILC Script Analysis — Sweet — Fridays 11:30-2:30 HI291-ILC Special Topics: Holocaust Drama — Weintrob — Fridays 11:30-2:30 NOTE: Students must elect to register for the course in Theatre or History. Choose carefully, as this course will only count toward the discipline for which you enroll. Completion of this single course satisfies the ILC requirement. Students who have previously taken TH 103 may not register for this ILC. Students who want credit for TH 103 on their transcript must register for this ILC as TH 103. Students who take this ILC may not take TH 103 in a future semester.


ILC 13: Honors Team-Taught: Law and Society — SPC 252 or SO 300 This honors course explains the American civil law system by examining it within the context of broader social issues in society. While this course does introduce undergraduate students to the basic concepts, processes, institutions, and procedures of the American civil law system (such as contracts and torts), its main purpose is to examine critically how law affects society and how society affects law. Sociological theories of the relationship between law and society are discussed, and historical case studies of the relationship between “law on the books” and “the law in action” are examined.  This class also teaches students the basic elements of trial advocacy, including complaint and answer, discovery, motion practice, opening statements, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, objections, and closing arguments.  Students will practice trial advocacy by participating in the mock trial of an existing unresolved civil case based on their own research.   Accordingly, significant preparation outside of class will be required.


SPC 252-ILC (H) Mock Trial — Martin — MW 8:00-9:30 am (If chosen, fulfills the General Education Speech requirement.) SO 300-ILC (H) Law and Society — Esser — MW 8:00-9:30 am NOTE: Students must elect to register for the course in Speech or Sociology. Choose carefully, as this course will only count toward the discipline for which you enroll. Students who choose Speech will fulfill the General Education Speech requirement. Completion of this single course satisfies the ILC requirement. This is an honors course. Students who have previously taken SPC 252 or SO 300 may not register for this ILC. Students who take this ILC may not take SPC 252 or SO 300 in a future semester.


ILC 14: Honors Team-Taught: Computing Across the Sciences — BI 291 (TC) or CH 291 (TC) This honors course will provide students with hands-on training and exposure to widely used technical software packages. Students will analyze data sets sourced from Biology, Chemistry, Physics and medical applications. The course will also provide an introduction to programming logic and functional programming. Students will be trained to perform visualization of biomolecules and gain proficiency in molecular editing and drawing. Most of the data analysis will be carried out on the powerful technical and symbolic computing platform, Mathematica. The tools and skills acquired from this course can be used across many other courses. The course will culminate in a research project that showcases student proficiency and combines computing with their chosen field of interest. BI 291-ILC Computing Across the Sciences (TC) (H) — Blaize — Mondays and Wednesdays 2:40–4:10 CH 291-ILC Computing Across the Sciences (TC) (H) — Sharma — Mondays and Wednesdays 2:40–4:10 NOTE: Students must elect to register for the course in Biology or Chemistry. Choose carefully, as this course will only count toward the discipline for which you enroll. Completion of this single course satisfies the ILC requirement and fulfills the Technological Competency (TC) requirement. This is an honors course. Students who took CH 291: Computing in Chemistry (TC) in Spring 2015 may not take this ILC.


ILC 15: Honors Team-Taught: Cities and Perversities: Art and Literature in Turn-of-the-Century Paris, Vienna, and Berlin (W) (I) — AH 326, EN 310, or FR 310 This honors team-taught ILC focuses on the art and literature in the fin-de-siècle in four major European centers: Paris, Vienna, and Berlin.  The works of the period are studied in relation to issues of national identity, as a response to the shock of metropolitan life, sexuality, the impact of psychoanalysis, escapism and withdrawal to the interior.  We will undertake a detailed reading of some of the major literary works of the period by authors such as Marcel Proust, Colette, Thomas Mann, Rainer Maria Rilke and Arthur Rimbaud. Artistic movements studied include Symbolism, Expressionism, Art Nouveau and Jugendstil.  The course attempts to understand the shared visual and literary language of turn-of-the-century Europe, while illuminating the special contributions of each city.  The course includes museum visits, films, special lectures and shared readings and assignments. AH 326-ILC Cities and Perversities (W) (I) (H) — Morowitz — Tuesdays & Thursdays 2:40–4:10 EN 310-ILC Literature in Turn of the Century (W) (I) (H) — Urbanc — Tuesdays & Thursdays 2:40–4:10 FR 310-ILC Literature in Turn of the Century (W) (I) (H) — Urbanc — Tuesdays & Thursdays 2:40–4:10 NOTE: Students must elect to register for the course in one of the following three disciplines: Art History, English, or French. Choose carefully, as this course will only count toward the discipline for which you enroll. Completion of this single course satisfies the ILC requirement and fulfills the International Perspectives (I) requirement. This is an honors course. Students who have previously taken this ILC (regardless of whether it is listed as AH 326-ILC, EN 310-ILC, or FR 310-ILC) may not take this ILC again. Students who take this ILC may not take AH 326, EN 310, or FR 310 in a future semester.


ILC 16: Honors Team-Taught: The Psychology of Racial Prejudice and the Role it Played in the Civil Rights Movement (D) — HI 291 or PS 240 This honors ILC will examine the key events, figures, philosophies, tactics, and consequences of the modern civil rights movement in the United States from a historical perspective and explore the psychological and social meaning of racial prejudice and the role it played in the denial of rights to African Americans in the Jim Crow South from Reconstruction to 1970s.   HI 291-ILC History of the Civil Rights Movement (D) (H) — Reynolds — Wednesdays 4:20–7:20 PS 240-ILC Psychology of Prejudice (D) (H) — McNair — Wednesdays 4:20–7:20 NOTE: Students must elect to register for the course in History or Psychology. Choose carefully, as this course will only count toward the discipline for which you enroll. Completion of this single course satisfies the ILC requirement and fulfills the American Diversity (D) requirement. This is an honors course. Students who have previously taken this ILC (whether it is listed as HI 236-ILC, HI 291-ILC, PS 240-ILC, or PS 291-ILC) may not take this ILC again. Students who take this ILC may not take PS 240 in a future semester.


Team-Taught ILC for Transfer Students (Transfer Students Only Until Drop/Add Period): Children: Psychology, Film and Literature — MDS 111 or PS 111 This is one of the few college courses for which all students have a point of reference. You were all children once. This ILC will focus on the physical, emotional and cognitive development of children during the first decade of life. In addition, we will explore elements of childhood psychopathology, like depression and suicide and significant social issues, including childhood cancer and conceptions of death and bereavement in childhood. The logistical and theoretical information will be reinforced through depictions of this period of development in both film and literature. This will bring the material to life and make it more relevant to the lives of the children students will have contact with during the experiential component of the course. PS 111-ILC Child Psychology — Oglio — Wednesdays 2:40–5:40 MDS 111-ILC — Childhood in Film & Literature — Wednesdays 2:40–5:40 NOTE: Students who are not transfer students may enroll in the course if there is space during the Drop/Add period. They do not have to complete the experiential component in the Early Childhood Center. Students must elect to register for the course in Psychology or MDS. Choose carefully, as this course will only count toward the discipline for which you enroll. Completion of this single course satisfies the ILC requirement. Students who have previously taken PS 111 may not register for this ILC. Students who take this ILC may not take PS 111 in a future semester.

Fall 2015 ILCs

ILC 1 (Two-Unit Washington Internship)

GOV 395-ILC Washington Internship — Kraus

GOV 396-ILC Dynamics of American Government  

 

ILC 2 (Two Units)

MI 200-ILC Microbiology — Bobbitt

MI 200L Microbiology Lab — Select any section of MI 200L

NR 224-ILC Nutrition & Health  

 

ILC 3 (Two Units)

FI 201-ILC Principles of Finance — Tully — Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:00-2:30 pm

SPC 103-ILC Public Speaking — Fenley — Mondays & Wednesdays 1:00-2:30 pm  

 

ILC 4 (Two Units)

CS 107-ILC Computers: Fundamentals of Networking and Internet (TC) — Moore — Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:40-4:10 pm

MK 324-ILC Digital Marketing — Dong — Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00-2:30 pm  

 

ILC 5 (Two Units)

FM 222-ILC Introduction to Documentary Filmmaking — Friedland — Fridays 1:00-4:00 pm

SP 242-ILC Untold Stories:  Latin American Culture and Civilization (I) — Sánchez — Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00-2:30 pm  

 

ILC 6 (Two Units)

AS 105-ILC Astronomy: The Solar System — Raths — Mondays and Wednesdays 1:00-2:30 pm

PH 205-ILC Philosophy of Mind — Danisi — Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:40-11:10 am  

 

ILC 7 (One Unit, Team Taught)

CH 291-ILC Special Topics: Getting Away With Murder — Ciavarella

SO 291-ILC — Pinto Mondays 6:00-9:00 pm  

 

ILC 8 (One Unit, Team Taught)

SPC 252-ILC Mock Trial — Pinto

SO 270-ILC Criminal Procedure — Martin — Wednesdays 6:00-9:00 pm  

 

ILC 9 (One Unit, Team Taught, For Transfer Students or With Permission of Instructors)

PS 111-ILC Child Psychology — Taverner

MDS 111-ILC — Childhood in Film & Literature — Kiss Wednesdays 2:40-5:40    

 

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