Programs

EVENTS: SPRING 2022

JANUARY 25, @7 PM: (in person or zoom):

 

Italian Cultural Foundation at Casa Belvedere in partnership with the WCHC Screening of “Our Hebrews” and Q&A live from Tel Aviv with the director to commemorate International Holocaust Remembrance Day.
In southern Tuscany, locals refer to their town as ‘Little Jerusalem,’ because of its striking resemblance to Israel’s ancient city. Through the medieval stone walls, the fascinating story of co-existence between Jews and Christians since the 15th century unfolds, leading to the heroic acts done by the locals during the time of the Holocaust. Naor Meninghe is an award-winning filmmaker and content creator of podcasts and vlogs. He graduated from Steve Tisch Film School at Tel Aviv University, after three years as a military filmmaker in the Israeli Defense Forces. His short films The Rat’s Dilemma (2014), An Old Score (2016) and Our Hebrews (2016) were screened in many film festivals. Proof of vaccination is required for all guests at Casa Belvedere, 79 Howard Avenue.
Watch the trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfpJgAW8ER8

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JANUARY 27 @ 6PM: INTERNATIONAL HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE DAY via zoom

Virtual Commemoration From Awareness to Action:
Confronting Antisemitism At Home and Abroad
Join Dr. Robert Williams for a discussion about how current conspiracy theories and tropes fuel antisemitism domestically and internationally. Deputy Director for International Affairs at the U.S.Holocaust Memorial Museum, Williams will also address how and why Holocaust education is one of many ways to combat it. This event is organized by the Harriet & Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center at Queensborough Community College and is co-sponsored by the Wagner College Holocaust Center and several other Holocaust organizations.
Please register here for zoom: https://tinyurl.com/4f4yp6wx

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FEBRUARY 10 2022@ 1:00 PM

 

IGNORANCE, ABUSE AND COMPETITION IN THE POLITICS OF HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE
DR. DIRK RUPNOW, PROFESSOR AT THE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY HISTORY AND DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF PHILOSOPHY AND HISTORY, UNIVERSITY OF INNSBRUCK
After a period of globalization and institutionalization, Holocaust remembrance appears to be subject to profound changes. This talk attempts to outline the status and the present challenges in European, “Western” and global contexts. It will raise questions about the meaning of Holocaust remembrance in the increasingly divers European “migration societies”, not the least during a moment of a perceived refugee crises in Europe, as well as evident Racism and ever growing Islamophobia; and at the same time, the global “competition” between memory of the Holocaust and the crimes of European colonial powers, as well as their relative place in European memory. These are not new questions, but ones that are increasingly relevant and controversial.

 

register in advance: https://wagner.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAuf-uorDgsGtIiXW1BUUh12hWewlShKu7A

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FEBRUARY 22 @ 2pm, zoom

Remembering Resistance: Sophie Scholl and the White Rose
In 1943, Sophie Scholl and her brother Hans were arrested by the Gestapo after they distributed anti-Nazi leaflets to students at the University of Munich Sophie, Hans, and Christoph Probst, another member of the White Rose group, were executed on February 22, 1943. The program will feature a conversation between Frank McDonough, author of Sophie Scholl: The Real Story of the Woman Who Defied Hitler, and Nathan Stoltzfus, the Dorothy and Jonathan Rintels Professor of Holocaust Studies at Florida State University, moderated by Dr. Lori Weintrob, Wagner College Holocaust Center. A virtual screening of the Academy Award nominated film Sophie Scholl: The Final Days will be made available one week before the program.
Register here for this virtual
discussion, a program of the Museum of Jewish Heritage:
https://mjhnyc.org/events/remembering-resistance-sophie-scholl-and-the-white-rose/
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MARCH 6@ 1:00 PM

The Politics of a New Hannah Szenes Memorial
Dr. Andrea Pető is Professor in the Department of Gender Studies at Central European University, Vienna Austria and a Doctor of Science of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
This talk focuses on the commemoration of Jewish and Hungarian heroine Hannah (Anikó) Szenes in Budapest, on the 100th anniversary of her birth. At twenty-three years old, Szenes parachuted into Yugoslavia in March 1944 where she was caught, tortured and executed.While her life story has been canonized in Israel, in her native land of Hungary she has largely been condemned to oblivion. The different circles of memory and forgetting around Szenes are made up of key elements of 20th century Hungarian, European and Israeli history, which intersected precisely in narrating Szenes’ life story. Dr.Pető will further shed light on the  historical oblivion that so often befalls women who perform historical deeds.

 

Register in advance for this meeting:

https://wagner.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAkc–prTMjGdOtWpEXW2-LVKxyArJbp2K7

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March 8, 2022 @ 6pm, zoom
Telling the Story of Zionist Settlement Through Language
Liora Halperin is an Associate Professor of International Studies, History, and Jewish Studies, and the Jack and Rebecca Benaroya Endowed Chair in Israel Studies at the
University of Washington.
This talk will explore the history of Jewish agricultural settlement in Palestine/Israel through the lens of language. What happened when Yiddish speaking settlers purchased land from Arabic speaking owners with the help of Ladino-speaking (Judeao-Spanish) intermediaries in an Ottoman Turkish context? How did they relate to the Arabic-speaking  workers the first of them hired? How did the story change as more of them started speaking Hebrew in a context of English control after World War I, after Zionist forces displaced most Arabic speaking Palestinians in 1948 and after Israel occupied many of them again in 1967? How did older settlers confront and content with Jewish newcomers speaking Polish, German, Arabic, and many other languages? Why did the stakes of speaking one language or another feel so consequential? How do we think about the role of language amidst shifting power relations, economic hierarchies, and nationalist
movements?

Register in advance for this meeting:

https://wagner.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMkd-qsqDwuH9R_Pa0Seyp0pQpG1PawM2eg

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MARCH 17 2022@ 7PM, zoom

Presented at the Kingsborough-Manhattan Beach Holocaust Memorial Center

Capturing the Unspeakable: Art as a Tool for Learning about the Holocaust
Dr. Laura Morowitz is Professor of Art History at Wagner College and the Senior Research and Programming Assistant at the Wagner College Holocaust Center
Over 30,000 works of art survived the Holocaust; they serve as eyewitness sources as well as enabling our subjective and emotional understanding. In this talk, Professor Laura Morowitz explores works of art created in hiding, ghettos and concentration camps, revealing how they can serve as a unique tool in teaching and learning about the Holocaust. In contrast to sources that may attempt to convey the overwhelming nature of mass murder, works of art testify to individuality, the richness of an individual consciousness, and thus bring home the tragic loss of a single, unique human being.
Registration in advance:
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April 7, 7pm, in-person:

Opening Reception for the Education and Action Gallery of the Wagner College Holocaust Center

Please join us in celebrating the opening of the first Holocaust Center in Staten Island. Our Education and Action gallery includes a tribute wall to the Holocaust survivors of our borough. Our exhibition also highlights the role of resistors and rescuers, as well as American soldiers of all faiths in World War II. Elected officials, Holocaust survivors and their families, along with those who have helped to make this Gallery a reality, will be acknowledged.
To make a reservation, email: holocaust.center@wagner.edu

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April 14, 7pm, zoom

The Art of Survival: Friedl Dicker-Brandeis and Children’s Art at Theresienstadt

Dr. Megan Brandow-Faller is Professor of History at the City University of New York (CUNY)and teaches at the CUNY Graduate Center. She is a member of the Kingsborough Holocaust Advisory Board
Bauhaus-trained artist and designer Friedl Dicker-Brandeis (1898-1944) brought the philosophies of progressive art education to the NSDAP ghetto and concentration camp at Theresienstadt, teaching drawing to imprisoned children, mostly girls, to inspire hope and self-expression under the most adverse conditions. While most of “Friedl’s girls” ultimately perished, Dicker-Brandeis’s surviving students spoke of their teacher’s remarkable ability to create a nurturing atmosphere where students could express hopes, fears and dreams as a temporary release from the brutal ghetto around them. Examining Dicker-Brandeis’s intellectual influences in Secessionist Vienna and the Weimar Bauhaus, Dr. Brandow-Faller’s talk focuses on Dicker-Brandeis’s brief but heroic teaching and exhibition career in the children’s homes of Theresienstadt, where art became a means of humanistic, if not physical, survival for its youngest inhabitants.

 

This event is organized by the Kingsborough Holocaust Center and is cosponsored by the Wagner College Holocaust Center.
Register in advance for this Zoom meeting here.

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APRIL 28,7 PM IN HONOR OF YOM HASHOAH 2022 Holocaust Martyrs and Heroism Day

“Ordinary People” as Heroes for Hiding Jews in Nazi-Occupied
Holland: Leo Ullman as a hidden child and his
rescuers in Amsterdam during WWII.
Leo Ullman emigrated to the U.S. in 1947. He attended Harvard College (A.B.), served in the U.S. Marine Corps and, in only three years, earned degrees at Columbia University’s Graduate Schools of Law (J.D)and Business (M.B.A.). A member of the New York Bar, Ullman practiced law for more than 30 years. He established and took to the New York Stock Exchange a real estate investment trust in 2003, for which he was named Ernst & Young’s Entrepreneur of the Year in the Financial Services area. He currently heads Vastgood Properties, a private real estate company. Mr. Ullman served as a Director and later Chairman of the Anne Frank Center, USA. He presently serves as Chairman of the Foundation for the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam, Inc. and the Netherlands National Holocaust Museum. At the United States National Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., he and his wife, Kay (Katharine Lott Marbut), have co-sponsored at the exhibit “State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda.” They have also funded the creation of the “Schimmel and Hoogenboom Righteous Remembrance Room” at Stockton University’s Holocaust Resource Center. Ullman chronicled his experiences as a hidden child in the book, 796 Days: Hiding as a Child in Occupied Amsterdam in World War II, and in a recent film, There Were Good People…Doing Extraordinary Deeds.
Of the approximately 145,000 Jews in Holland before WWII, an estimated 25,000 Jewish men, women and children went into hiding in the Netherlands, including 3-1/2-year-old Leo Ullmann. What motivated rescuers of all faiths to act with inherent goodness and courage despite the enormous risk? Among nearly 6,000 rescuers were Pieter Hoogenboom, a policeman in Utrecht, and his wife Evertje, and Hendrik Schimmel, a retired policeman in Amsterdam, and his wife Jannigje. In the face of almost certain death, they helped provide hiding places, false identity papers and food, and enabled limited contacts among Ullmann family members in hiding in Amsterdam and elsewhere. In 2015, the rescuers of Leo and his family were recognized by Yad Vashem as Righteous Among the Nations.
Our program with include Hebrew songs played on cello by Laura Melnicoff.

 

REGISTER IN ADVANCE:https://alumniconnect.wagner.edu/2022holocaustheroismday?erid=5683479&trid=0f8c4a53-19f1-4932-ba82-cb33edc35cc0 _______________________________________

May 16-June 20, 2022

Opening of Art Exhibit: Linda Stein’s Tapestry Series Fierce Females: Holocaust Heroes
We welcome you to visit our exhibit of original tapestries by artist Linda Stein, dedicated to heroines of the Holocaust
Heroic Tapestries represent different aspects of bravery during the time of the Holocaust: Jew and non-Jew, child and adult, World War II military fighter and ghetto/concentration camp smuggler, record keeper and saboteur. Together they represent the many types of female heroism, with war battle gear and without, during the years of the Holocaust.
The Holocaust Heroes project demonstrates that while most people are bystanders under conditions of terror, there are always a few who defy a malevolent authority and do what they feel is the right thing. If heroes existed during the Holocaust, then certainly we can increase the propensity for individuals to become more empathetic and compassionate under normal conditions.
This project is guided by an advisory group of art experts, Holocaust scholars, and individuals who are the offspring of Holocaust-impacted families, including political scientist Jerome Chanes, psychologist Eva Fogelman, healthcare expert Susanna Ginsburg, art educator Karen Keifer-Boyd, art historian and curator Gail Levin, museum director Jeanie Rosensaft, and Holocaust and human rights law professor Menachem Rosensaft. The editor of our exhibition catalog is Amy Stone and the producer of our short video and future documentary is Sarah Connors.

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May 2022 (date TBA)

Witness Theater: Staten Island Survivors
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May 25, 2022:

Chai Society Mitzvah Dinner
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June 15-16, 2022:

International Symposium “Heroines of the Holocaust: New Frameworks of Resistance.”
Organized by Professors Laura Morowitz and Lori Weintrob, Wagner College
The activities of women during the Holocaust have often been forgotten, erased, misunderstood, or intentionally distorted. Jewish women and those of all faiths fought with dignity, compassion and courage to save others from the murderous Nazi regime in over 30 nations. Often overlooked, women as well as men played critical roles in uprisings against the Nazis in over 50 ghettos, 18 forced labor camps and 5 concentration camps, including Auschwitz. Women were critical to the Jewish underground and other resistance networks both as armed fighters and as strategists and couriers of intelligence and false papers. Women played essential roles operating educational, cultural and humanitarian initiatives. In other genocides, women also faced horrendous atrocities, yet distinguished themselves with resilience and acts of moral courage. This symposium hopes to create a new narrative around agency in the Shoah and other genocides, which may inspire transformative activism today.
For information on the symposium and to register please visit the website:
https://sites.google.com/wagner.edu/heroines

https://alumniconnect.wagner.edu/symposium2021

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PAST EVENTS FALL 2021



Photo: Liberation, 1945: Lore Baer (first row, middle) and her mother Edith,
along with her rescuer Cornelia Schouten (second row, 3rd from left) and her family and other helpers in the Netherlands.

Please join us for the 6th Annual Egon J. Salmon and Family Commemoration of Kristallnacht and the S.S. St. Louis

BEYOND ANNE FRANKHiding from the Nazis in the Netherlands

Lore Baer Azaria, Holocaust survivor and art therapist, whose experiences are featured in the 1997 children’s book: Hidden from the Nazis by David Adler (1997) and in the film Secret Lives: Hidden Children and their Rescuers during WWII (2003), directed by Avivia Slesin.

Wednesday, November 10, 2021 at 7:00 p.m. EST via Zoom

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Black Heroines of World War II
September 30, 11:30 a.m. via Zoom

As spies, nurses and clandestine couriers, Black women in France played vital, overlooked roles in the anti-Nazi war effort. Jane Vialle, an operative for Combat in  Southern France, was arrested in 1943 for treason, but survived and became a Senator. Josephine Baker’s fight against Hitler’s Regime from Berlin to Lisbon has earned her a place in the Pantheon of French heroism.

Annette Joseph-Gabriel is Assistant Professor of French and Francophone Studies, University of Michigan and author, Reimagining Liberation: How Black Women Transformed Citizenship in the French Empire (University of Illinois Press, 2020).  Introductory remarks by Virginia Allen, Staten Island’s “Black Angel” nurse.

Krakow Women and Resistance (Power of our Stories)
Sponsored by the New Cracow Friendship Society
October 17, 1:00 p.m.

An exploration of the voices and resistance activities of several notable Jewish women, including Gusta Dawidson Draenger, code name Justyna, with speaker Sheryl Ochayon, of Echoes and Reflections and Yad Vashem. Introducted and moderated by Lori Weintrob, Wagner College.

Israel Night: Media Bias (with Hillel of Wagner College)
October 5, 1:00 p.m.via Zoom and in-person

Join Wagner College Hillel as we host a guest speaker to help us discuss media biases concerning Israel and current Israeli affairs. This disucssion is bound to challenge all who attend and foster conversations for people of all religions, experiences, and backgrounds. All are welcome and encouraged to join for this powerful discussion. Several Wagner students will briefly present their own experiences in Israel.

Jews of Color Count
Wednesday, October 26. 6:00 p.m.

Co-sponsored with the Dr. Esther Grushkin Center for Arts + Culture, with Ms. Ginna Green, a political strategist, former Chief Strategy Officer at Bend the Arc: Jewish Action and a Fellow of the Kogod Research Center at the Shalom Hartman Institute of North America. Green will share her vision of a vibrant, equitable, multiracial Jewish community.

More than Gold: Jesse Owens and the 1936 Olympic Games
October 31, 4:00 p.m.via Zoom

Sponsored by the Sousa Mendes Foundation, this event features Jesse Owen’s grandson, Scott Owen Rankin, executive director of the Jesse Owens Foundation, Dr. Lori Weintrob, Wagner College, and Anita L. DeFrantz, Vice President of the International Olympic Committee, moderated by Robert Jacobvitz. Register here: https://sousamendesfoundation.org/event/jesse-owens

Across the Pyrenees: Helping Jewish Refugees Fleeing Nazi Terror
October 14, 4:15 p.m. via Zoom

Nazi persecution caused Jews from Germany, Austria and other countries to seek refuge in France, or to travel through France on their way out of Europe. Many without proper visas were forced to walk across the Pyrenees to reach Spain and Portugal, avoiding border patrols, to then catch ships to other continents. Those who guided the Jewish refugees on this arduous trek, known as passeurs, faced many dangers. Two female passeurs will be examined in depth.

Jacqueline Adams is an award-winning sociologist and Senior researcher at the University of California, Berkeley for the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues and a Research Fellow in 2021-2022 at the International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem.

Luncheon in honor of Rabbi Samuel Kastel, Dan Glassman, and Dr. Lori Weintrob
November 14, 12:00 p.m.

This event supports and is held at Congregation B’nai Jeshrun, 275 Martling Avenue, Staten Island, NY.

Tickets are available ($75/pp) on the CBJ wesbite: https:www.cbjsi.com/

Empowering Women: Lessons from a Survivor of Genocide
November 17, 11:30 p.m.via Zoom/In-person

This event will feature speaker Consolee Nishimwe, global human rights activist and author of Tested to the Limit: A Genocide Survivor’s Story of Pain, Resilience and Hope.

 

 

 


PAST EVENTS

Spring 2021 Events

January 20, 7pm: 
One Hand, One Heart: An intergenerational celebration of Broadway and Yiddish Song

A multi-ethnic singing club, Shir Levav (Sing from the Heart) joins with Holocaust Survivor Arthur Spielman to perform music by Jewish composers of Broadway and a few favorite Yiddish songs. Guest Host: 2nd generation survivor Mickey Tennenbaum, Professor of Theater, Wagner College. Ms. Jan Martin will offer opening remarks. Co-Sponsored by the Wagner College Chai Society and Holocaust Center and the Staten Island Jewish Community Center, Esther Grushkin Seminars in Adult Jewish Education (SAJE).

Register in advance for this meeting:

https://wagner.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJcvcO2qqD4qH90tnvM4DN6pJbCb8bbLpxdd 

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. For information, contact Prof. Lori Weintrob: holocaust.center@wagner.edu

January 27, 7pm
Intergenerational Transmission of Mass Trauma in Families of Survivors

Keynote: Irit Felsen, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist specializing in trauma and traumatic loss teaches at Columbia University and Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University.

With a special presentation and candle lighting by Manny Saks and Rabbi Mark Ben-Aron, 2nd Generation, and 3G grandchildren of Staten Island’s Holocaust Survivors. 

International Holocaust Remembrance Commemoration

Co-sponsored by Staten Island Inter-religious Leadership, Wagner College Holocaust Center, Chai Society and Hillel, Congregation B’nai Jeshrun, COJO (Council of Jewish Organizations of Staten Island) and CURT (Communities United for Respect and Trust).

This live talk and Q&A will explore the strengths, challenges and long-term effects of trauma, with particular relevance to children and grandchildren of Holocaust survivors, and its relevance in the current moment. 

Register in advance for this meeting:
https://wagner.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEtd-2sqjorH9dRcaT1nf9d47DyRVPjV4M7
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. For information, contact Prof. Lori Weintrob: holocaust.center@wagner.edu

February 24 (1-2pm NY time, 8-9pm Israel time)
The Artist as Holocaust Heroine: Friedl Dicker-Brandeis 

Speaker: Elena Makarova is a writer, educator, historian and exhibit curator, specializing in Jewish spiritual resistance in the Terezin Ghetto and Concentration Camp, particularly through art. Ms. Markova will talk about Dicker-Brandeis’ exceptional work as a teacher and her impact on modern art therapy. This event will be moderated by Prof. Lori R. Weintrob, Director, Wagner College Holocaust Center, who will discuss how Dicker-Brandeis’ political commitments informed her educational vision. 

You are invited to a Zoom meeting.

When: Feb 24, 2021 01:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Register in advance for this meeting:

https://wagner.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMvd-mprT0jE9xF8lf8c9Ev6eyqCNw8ub1z

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

March 1, 7-8:15pm
Tradition!: The Making of Fiddler on the Roof in Yiddish.”

Join the conversation with Roy Gabay, producer of the Yiddish version of Sholem Aleichem’s work, Fiddler on the Roof, along with two actors, Jennifer Babiak and WCT graduate, Jonathan Quigley. Babiak played Golde, the mother of five daughters. A brief clip of Quigley in the “bottle dance” will be shown. We’ll discuss how the Yiddish production came to be, the hurdles the cast had to overcome and the meaningful experiences for all involved. 

Moderated by Todd Price, professor in the Theatre and Arts Administration programs at Wagner College who also serves as Director of the Stanley Drama Awards.

This event is sponsored by the Wagner College Holocaust Center and Wagner College Theatre.

Register in advance for this meeting:

https://wagner.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJApdeuhqDouHdGB0t1waLia6loMOdv0Sf0o 

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Thursday, March 4th 7:00-9:00pm
Primo Levi (1919-1987), Holocaust survivor

How can one find the words to describe the trauma and agony suffered at Auschwitz after one’s humanity has been taken away? Francesco Bonavita will explore Levi’s life; how Italian Jews saw themselves vis-à-vis the rise of fascism; his experience at Auschwitz; and his commitment to keep alive the narrative of the Holocaust. Born in Rome, Bonavita earned his doctorate in Comparative Literature on the Italian Renaissance.  He taught at Kean University and NYU and writes about Italian cities on his blog, www.thewondersofitaly.com.

To register:

 

March 15, 4-5:30 pm
Mildred Harnack and the German Resistance to Hitler

CUNY Center for the Study of Women and Society. Free public zoom lecture:

Rebecca Donner will discuss the challenges in writing All the Frequent Troubles of Our Days, a work of narrative nonfiction about her great-great-aunt Mildred Harnack, the only American in the leadership of Berlin ’ s underground resistance during the Nazi regime. She will speak about the often-lost narrative of women in the German resistance and her archival discoveries as she set out to fuse elements of biography, political thriller, and scholarly detective story, interweaving letters, diaries, notes smuggled out of a Berlin prison, testimony of survivors, and declassified intelligence documents to reconstruct the moral courage of an enigmatic woman nearly erased by history.

For more information or to RSVP, click here: https://bit.ly/WWWLRebeccaDonner.

(Please note: an email with Zoom details will be sent on the day of the event.)

 

March 15, 7-8pm
With Pen and Pistol: Heroines of the Holocaust

Holocaust Memorial Center – Zekelman Family Campus
(See their website for details)
Speaker: Prof. Lori Weintrob

 “You do not know the limits of my courage,” proclaimed Marianne Cohn to the Nazi guards who captured her while smugglng children across the French border to Switzerland. Trapped in Nazi-occupied Europe, thousands of women fought with defiance and dignity with pen and pistol to save themselves and others in situations of great danger and despair. 

March 16th, 7pm Museum of Jewish Heritage
Heroines of The Holocaust

During the Holocaust, more than 3,000 women fought back against the Nazis in ghettos, forced labor camps, concentration camps, and partisan units. Join Dr. Lori Weintrob, Director of the Wagner College Holocaust Center, and Holocaust survivor Rachel Roth and moderator Rokhl Kaffrissen, for a program exploring the heroic lives and legacies of these female resistance fighters. Register for the event: 

https://mjhnyc.org/events/heroines-of-the-holocaust-2/

March 29, 1:15pm
Annihilation or Selective Preservation? The Nazi ‘Cultural Genocide’ in Vienna during the Holocaust

Tim Corbett, Historian

Vienna’s five Jewish cemeteries are potent sites for construction and contestation of Austria’s Jewish heritage. Dr. Corbett will discuss issues raised in his book, Die Grabstätten meiner Väter: die jüdischen Friedhöfe Wiens Böhlau, 2021, about their destruction during the Holocaust and the post-war politics surrounding this form of cultural erasure of the achievements of centuries of Jewish Viennese men and women. A historian, editor, and translator, Dr. Corbett specializes in the modern cultural history of Austrian Jews. He was named as the inaugural 2018 Prins Fellow at the Center for Jewish History in New York. Moderated by Prof. Laura Morowitz, Art Historian. 

Register in advance for this meeting:
https://wagner.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIqd-GspjwsHdVP6CchZ6IgDCkL3220T4xY
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

 For information, contact Prof. Lori Weintrob: holocaust.center@wagner.edu

Wednesday, April 14th @ 7pm 
From Romania to Auschwitz to New York: The Hecht Family

Film and Discussion

An international student from Romania, Rebeca Zoicas was inspired by meeting Auschwitz survivor Stefania Hecht to make a short documentary film. The film follows Stefania’s story from where she grew up in the northern part of Romania (then part of Hungary), to Auschwitz and a work camp in Czechoslovakia and finally to New York City.  Dr. Alex Hecht, Stefania’s son, founded the Northern Transylvania Holocaust Museum in 2005 to promote Holocaust education.  

You are invited to a Zoom meeting.

When: Apr 14, 2021 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Register in advance for this meeting:

https://wagner.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUtc-irrD8vGda0bvhzxHWv5WFuadSJS_1Y

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

April 8th, 7pm: 
Staten Island Yom Ha’Shoah Committee Commemoration

Program TBA

April 20, 7 pm:
Anna Wrobel, Bearing Witness: Stories of the Holocaust – “Second Generation/First Person: Memory, History, and Poetry”

Birmingham Holocaust Education Center

Anna Wrobel is the daughter of Holocaust survivors – partisan and soldier – an American historian, teacher, poet and Holocaust Studies educator. Her history essays and poetry appear in Cafe Review, Lilith, Off the Coast and Jewish Currents. Anna has two poetry collections, Marengo Street (2012) and The Arrangement of Things (2018). Her poetry appeared in the University of Maine’s Holocaust Human Rights Center art/poetry exhibit, Dilemma of Memory, and are included in the Maine Jewish history exhibit at the State Museum. She’s presented at the Puffin Foundation on Jewish resistance in WWII and works with the Jewish Partisans Educational Foundation, to which her mother, Eta, was a founding consultant.  Shoah poems, taken from her manuscript Sparrow Feathers-Second Generation/First Person, have been used by history and English teachers in high schools, colleges and adult education.

Register Here

 

June 3, 12-1 PM EST
Heroines of the Holocaust: A Mini-Conference

 

 

 

The 5th Annual Egon J. Salmon and Family Commemoration of Kristallnacht and the St. Louis

Nov. 9, 2020, 7:00 pm

 

The Wagner College Holocaust Center welcomes you to join us for the 5th Annual Egon J. Salmon and Family Commemoration of Kristallnacht and the St. Louis on Monday, November 9th via Zoom at 7:00 p.m. The commemoration will be led by guest speaker Julian E. Zelizer, Professor of History and Public Affairs at Princeton University and CNN Analyst. This talk willl examine the ways in which fighting anti-Semitism and the quest for racial justice intersect, drawing inspiration from the life and theology of Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel (1907-72)

Fall 2020 Events

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Spring 2020 Events

SP20_Fiinal_HC Events Calendar brochure style (1)

 

 

Fall 2018 Events

FA18 HC Events Brochure
Download Events Brochure Here


Spring 2018 Events

HC_Events_Sp18_Brochure

Download Brochure Here


 

2016 Events

Download a copy of our Spring 2016 Events Calendar below:

Holocaust Center Events Spring 2016

Download a copy of our Fall 2016 Events Calendar below:

Holocaust Center Events Fall 2016

 


 

Past Events 2013-2017

  
Screen Shot 2021 11 18 at 10.38.49 PM
The Sixth Annual Egon J. Salmon and Family Commemoration of Kristallnacht and the S.S. St. Louis
November 19, 2021
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C91h-vVVVys The Wagner College Holocaust Center presents "Beyond Anne
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Interview with Survivor Estelle Laughlin, Aunt of WCHC and CHAI Society Board Member Fern Zagor
September 7, 2021
The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has devoted a one hour interview special, First Person,
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Fox-Bevilacqua: "We must harness Holocaust Memory to help those trapped in Afghanistan"
August 23, 2021
Noted journalist and filmmaker Marisa Fox-Bevilacqua, second generation survivor, is imploring American
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Dr. Weintrob reviews Batalion's The Light of Days
August 6, 2021
Read Dr. Lori Weintrob's review of our 2022 symposium keynote speaker, Judy Batalion's The Light of
Faye 2 pdf
Faye Shulman (28 November 1919-24 April 2021): Partisan, Photographer, Resister
April 27, 2021
“I want people to know that there was resistance. Jews did not go like sheep to the slaughter. I was
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Dr. Lori Weintrob to speak at Museum of Jewish History on Heroines of the Holocaust
March 10, 2021
presents:   Heroines of the Holocaust Tuesday, March 16 I 7 PM ET Register here: mjhnyc.info/heroines
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OUR VIRTUAL EXHIBIT ON THE HOLOCAUST
March 7, 2021
  We are very pleased to invite you to visit our permanent virtual exhibit on the Holocaust. 
Irit
Dr. Irit Felsen Speaks on Intergenerational Trauma for Holocaust Remembrance Day
February 11, 2021
On Wednesday, January 27th, 2021 we observed International Holocaust Remembrance Day with an interfaith
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COURAGE IN ACTION: HEROINE PARTISAN ETA WROBEL (1916-2008)
January 5, 2021
Eta Wrobel (1916-2008) Possessed of incredible bravery and pluck, Eta Wrobel refused to allow her destiny
Consolee Arlette
Good Amidst Evil: Rescue in Rwanda
November 18, 2020
On Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020, the Wagner College Holocaust Center and Black Student Union co-hosted a reading

Video Gallery: Full Events

2014 Kristallnacht anniversary program

On Monday, Nov. 10, Wagner College hosted its annual Kristallnacht remembrance luncheon, led by history professor Lori Weintrob. Holocaust survivor Gabi Held talked about his experience as a teenager during Kristallnacht and as a Nazi prisoner in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. Wagner Hillel President Julia Teichman, the granddaughter of Holocaust survivors, also spoke. Watch 2014 Kristallnacht anniversary program

2014 Holocaust Remembrance Day speaker Bronia Brandman

On Thursday, April 24, 2014, Wagner College hosted this year's observance of Holocaust Remembrance Day, featuring keynote speaker Bronia Brandman, a survivor of Auschwitz and co-author of "The Girl Who Survived: A True Story of the Holocaust." Brandman is a gallery educator and member of the Speakers Bureau of the Museum of Jewish Heritage: A Living Memorial to the Holocaust. Watch 2014 Holocaust Remembrance Day speaker Bronia Brandman

Remembering Kristallnacht

On Thursday, Nov. 14, Wagner College marked the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht, the "Night of Broken Glass," with a luncheon lecture by Reni Hanau, a survivor of the Nazi terror. Watch Remembering Kristallnacht

A Holocaust Cabaret: Theater as Resistance

Survivor testimony adapted for the theater and performed by students. Based on interviews from the USC Shoah Foundation. Directed by Theresa McCarthy and Lori Weintrob. Video by Theresa Reed. Watch A Holocaust Cabaret: Theater as Resistance

Meet Consolee Nishimwe

Consolee Nishimwe is a Rwandan genocide survivor who shares her story of survival and forgiveness with global audiences. Nishimwe recently visited Wagner College where she spoke to students from Port Richmond High School. Watch Meet Consolee Nishimwe
Video thumbnail 2 2014 Kristallnacht anniversary program
Video thumbnail 3 2014 Holocaust Remembrance Day speaker Bronia Brandman
Video thumbnail 4 Remembering Kristallnacht
Video thumbnail 5 A Holocaust Cabaret: Theater as Resistance
Video thumbnail 6 Meet Consolee Nishimwe