Honors Courses

Honors courses are offered in every fall and spring semester. Honors courses have section numbers containing the letter H. Honors courses are more challenging, involve more discussion and debate, and often (if not always) require longer and more in-depth research papers and oral presentations by students. Honors courses are most certainly more demanding, usually involving more reading and preparation.

Any student with at least a 3.5 grade point average may enroll in an Honors course. Students who do not meet this criterion may request permission of the instructor to enroll in an Honors course.

Spring 2020 Honors Courses

CH 221-HL or PH 203-HL Computing, Ethics, and Firearms in America — Dr. Sharma & Dr. Donovan — Tuesdays & Thursdays 9:40–11:10 am

This Honors ILC for first-year students combines philosophy and computing to explore the social and moral issues surrounding firearm possession, use, and abuse in the United States. The philosophical discussions will be augmented by researching and analyzing data through programming in the Wolfram programming language. Students will learn exploratory data analysis, functional programming, and visual data representation to support their philosophical arguments. The course will have a strong research component and the entire class will participate in a research project.

Students must choose to take PH 203 or CH 221.

The course number will determine the one Knowledge Area granted for this Honors ILC:

  • Humanities (H) if taken as PH 203

or

  • Sciences & Mathematics (M) if taken as CH 221

This ILC provides the following Key Skills:

  • intensive Intercultural Understanding (UU)
  • intensive Critical Reading and Analysis (RR)
  • practice/exposure Written Communication (WC)

Contact: arunkumar.sharma@wagner.edu and sdonovan@wagner.edu

BI 125-HO Genes to Genomics — Dr. Cook — Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:20 am – 12:50 pm

This honors course reserved for first-year students is designed for non-science majors interested in the problems and promises associated with modern-day genetics. Discoveries and technological advances in genetics are taught with an emphasis on the social, moral, ethical issues facing society today.

A comment from the instructor: With the advances that are happening in Biotechnology, the field of Genetics is going through a scientific revolution. Things that were only dreamed about or perceived as mere fiction are becoming realities. This course is an exploration of some of these scientific discoveries and applications and their impact on our lives.

Major objectives of this Honor Course are:

1.Teach basic Human Genetics, Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering,

2.Encourage active participation of students in class discussions,

3.Explore the legal and social issues related to Biotechnology,

4. Debate whether the Eugenics movement is still with us and

5. Explore the impact of human genome research on society.

 

Topics Covered in the Course include

1.Evolution, Social Darwinism and Eugenics,

2.Genetics and The Human Genome Project,

3.Reproductive Technologies, Cloning, Stem Cell Research and Bioethics,

4.Genetic Screening, Genetic Testing, Gene Therapy and Gene Doping,

5.Criminology and DNA Forensics,

6.Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) and Genetic Patents and

7.Race and Genography and Genetic Discrimination

 

This Honors course can be counted as a Sciences & Mathematics (M) course in the Knowledge Areas, and it provides the following Key Skills:

  • practice/exposure Information Literacy (L)
  • practice/exposure Written Communication (WC)

Contact: heather.cook@wagner.edu

 

EN 356-HO / FR 356-HO French Cinema: Retrogrades, Rebels & Realists — Dr. Stalcup — Wednesdays 1:00–4:00 pm

This Honors course for first-year students introduces students to the major developments in the history of French cinema. The course aims to develop students’ skills of analysis and interpretation in order to enable them to read and appreciate film as an art form. The course is divided into three parts which present the three principal moments of French cinematic history: the films of Poetic Realism from the 1920s and 1930s; the films of the New Wave from the 1950s and 1960s, and fin-de-siècle films of the 1980s and 1990s. Film-viewings are supplemented by the study of film theory.

Taught in English.

Students must choose to take this cross-listed course as EN 356 or FR 356.

This Honors course can be counted as a Humanities course (H) in the Knowledge Areas, and it provides the following Key Skills:

  • intensive Intercultural Understanding (UU)
  • practice/exposure Critical Reading and Analysis (R)
  • intensive Written Communication (WW)

Contact: dane.stalcup@wagner.edu

SO 103-HO American Society and Its Social Problems — Dr. Esser — Mondays & Wednesdays 11:20 am – 12:50 pm

This Honors introduces students to American society and its social problems through the development and application of a sociological framework. We will use historical and cross-cultural comparisons to see contemporary social problems as products of broad changes in both the structure of social institutions (e.g. economic and political institutions) and in the social characteristics of the American population (e.g. ethnicity, race, social class, and gender). Assignments will include a policy position paper analyzing differences between Republican and Democratic policy positions in general and on a given campaign issue (e.g. healthcare or how to grow the economy) in particular.

This Honors course can be counted as a Social Science (S) course in the Knowledge Areas, and it provides the following Key Skills:

  • intensive Intercultural Understanding (UU)
  • practice/exposure Quantitative Thinking (Q)

Contact: jesser@wagner.edu

AH 326-HL / EN 310-HL / FR 310-HL Cities and Perversities: Literature in Turn of Century Paris, Vienna, Berlin, & Barcelona — Dr. Morowitz and Dr. Urbanc — Mondays 1:00–4:00 pm

This team-taught ILC focuses on the art and literature in the fin-de-siècle in three major European centers: Paris, Vienna, and Berlin. The works of the period are studied in relation to issues of national identity and as a response to the shock of metropolitan life. We will discuss attitudes toward sexuality, the rise of the crowd, alienation, the impact of psychoanalysis, escapism, and withdrawal to the interior. Readings include some of the major literary works of the period by authors such as Arthur Rimbaud, Marcel Proust, Stefan Zweig, Lou Andreas-Salomé, Robert Walser, and Thomas Mann. Artistic movements studied include Symbolism, Expressionism, Art Nouveau, and Jugendstil. We will also study the interrelation between paintings, sculpture, architecture, design, and the popular arts in this period.The course attempts to understand the shared visual and literary language of turn-of-the-century Europe, while illuminating the special contributions of each city. The course includes museum visits, films, special lectures, and shared readings and assignments.

Students must choose to earn the unit as AH 326, EN 310, or FR 310.

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, the course number will determine the Knowledge Area granted for this Honors ILC:

  • Arts (A) course if taken as AH 326

or

  • Humanities (H) if taken as EN 310 or FR 310

This ILC provides the following Key Skills:

  • practice/exposure Intercultural Understanding (U)
  • practice/exposure Creativity (C)
  • intensive Critical Reading and Analysis (RR)

Contact: lmorowit@wagner.edu and kurbanc@wagner.edu

NR 224-HL Nutrition & Health — Dr. Aurelus — Fridays 8:00–11:00 am

This intermediate learning community (ILC), intended for Nursing majors, includes an option for an Honors section of NR 224 Nutrition & Health, offered every fall and spring semester.

This ILC looks at the cellular nutrition of eukaryotes (humans) vs. the nutrition of prokaryotes (bacteria). The ILC also covers the similarities and differences in the structure, function and role of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins and trace elements in humans and bacteria.  Finally, it looks at the immunological aspects of nutrition across the human life span compared to the immunological aspects in disease prevention.

Students may take any section of MI 200 to complete the two-course ILC.

The Honors section of NR 224 offers a more challenging approach to the study of Nutrition & Health by requiring an additional research paper and a public presentation (such as at a health fair, to another class, or in a workshop).


MI 200 Microbiology — Bobbitt — Select any section of MI 200


MI 200L Microbiology Lab — Select any section of MI 200L (one 2-hour lab per week)


NR 224-HL Nutrition & Health — Aurelus — Fridays 8:00–11:00 am

 

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, NR 224 provides the following Key Skill:

  • practice/exposure Information Literacy (L)

Contact: edna.aurelus@wagner.edu

AN 306-HO Methods in GIS and Geomatics — Dr. Mullenite — Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00–2:30 pm

This class is an introduction to Geographic Information Software (GIS) and geomatics, the method and theory of collecting, managing, and using spatially referenced data. Geomatics is a transformative technology which is shaping the ways in which researchers from across the social, natural and physical sciences manage and combine multi-disciplinary data. Students will learn to find and make appropriate selection of pre-existing sets of data from public depositories. After an introduction to the basic methods of manipulating demographic, topographic and environmental information, students will develop and present a small project of their own design. Working with big data and complex computer programs can be difficult. However, careful control of the scope of project and practical considerations of available data will help produce successful projects. Offered as required. May be used to fulfill major and minor in Environmental Studies and Civic Engagement minor.

For students who entered Wagner College during or before Summer 2018, this Honors course fulfills the Technological Competency (TC) requirement.

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, this Honors course can be counted as a Social Science course (S) in the Knowledge Areas, and it provides the following Key Skills:

  • intensive Intercultural Understanding (UU)
  • intensive Technological Competency (TT)

Contact: joshua.mullenite@wagner.edu

EN 111-HO World Literature — Dr. Hurley — Mondays and Wednesdays 2:40–4:10

An introductory course covering fiction from English-speaking countries other than the U.S. and Great Britain such as Canada, India, and South Africa and writing in translation from such areas as Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America.

For students who entered Wagner College during or before Summer 2018, this Honors course is writing intensive (W), fulfills the English literature requirement (LIT), and meets the International Perspectives requirement (I).

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, this Honors course counts as a Humanities (H) course in the Knowledge Areas and provides the following Key Skills:

  • intensive Intercultural Understanding (UU)
  • practice/exposure Critical Reading and Analysis (R)
  • intensive Written Communication (WW)

Contact: ahurley@wagner.edu

 

GOV 112-HO Political Ideologies — Dr. Snow — 1:00–2:30 pm

This Honors course has several goals. First, to provide a comparative and critical understanding of the concept of ideology, and to introduce and analyze some of the most important contemporary political ideologies. We give particular attention to liberalism, conservatism, fascism, socialism, communism and Islamism. Second, the course aims to familiarize students with the origins and key concepts of contemporary political debates. Finally, by the end of the course students should identify which ideology (or ideologies) they find most convincing, as well as the most important criticisms of these ideologies. We will accomplish these goals by reading, thinking, talking and writing in depth about writings by, among others, Thomas More, Robert Owen, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Adam Smith, Murray Rothbard, Peter Singer, T.H. Green, Mikhail Bakunin, Emma Goldman, Sayyid Qutb and Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, this Honors course counts as a Social Science (S) course in the Knowledge Areas and provides the following Key Skill:

  • intensive Critical Reading and Analysis (RR)

Contact: sgsnow@wagner.edu

GOV 375-HO Feminist Film — Dr. Moynagh — Wednesdays 1:00–4:00 pm

This Honors course brings together the study of feminist theory with the interpretation of film from a gendered analysis. We will read several classic and contemporary works in feminist theory which will give us some critical tools for analyzing many different kinds of films. We will discuss whether or not the films can be regarded as feminist and what is at stake in making such judgments.

This Honors course can be counted as a Social Science course (S) in the Knowledge Areas, and it provides the following Key Skills:

  • intensive Intercultural Understanding (UU)
  • intensive Critical Reading and Analysis (RR)
  • practice/exposure Written Communication (WC)

Contact: patricia.moynagh@wagner.edu

HI 231-HO The Sixties: Protest and Reform — Dr. Palfreyman — Tuesdays & Thursdays 11:20–12:50

This Honors course examines one of the twentieth century’s most tumultuous decades.  From the War in Vietnam to the battle for civil rights, from atomic power to Flower Power, the story of the 1960s is full of fault lines – the moment the post-World War 2 consensus of the 1950s seemingly fell to pieces.  Looking at the “Sixties” broadly — from the late 1950s until the end of the Vietnam War in 1975 — this course will cover the Cold War, the space race, the Civil Rights Movements, women’s liberation, gay rights, counterculture, the anti-war movement, environmentalism, and more.

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, this Honors course counts as a Humanities (H) course in the Knowledge Areas and provides the following Key Skills:

  • practice/exposure Intercultural Understanding (U)
  • intensive Critical Reading and Analysis (RR)
  • practice/exposure Written Communication (WC)

Contact: brett.palfreyman@wagner.edu

HI 362-HO Renaissance Italy: 1300–1600 — Dr. Smith — Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:00–2:30

The period of great wealth and cultural magnificence in Italy that was fostered by rapid-growing city-states such as Florence and Venice. The course will focus on Renaissance music, literature, art, and architecture, as well as political life, the culture of the laboring classes, the roles of women, and the rise of highly sophisticated urban aristocracy.

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, this Honors course counts as a Humanities (H) course in the Knowledge Areas and provides the following Key Skills:

  • practice/exposure Information Literacy (L)
  • practice/exposure Oral Communication (O)
  • intensive Written Communication (WW)

Contact: asmith@wagner.edu

MI 109-HO Plagues, Outbreaks and Biological Warfare — Dr. Bobbitt — Mondays & Wednesdays 9:40–11:10 am

This Honors course is designed for non-science majors and meets the science distribution requirement. The course focuses on historical epidemics with emphasis on how scientist discovered, treated, and halted the spread of these illnesses and how the diseases shaped societies. Present-day epidemics are examined and attention is given to future epidemic threats. Organisms used in biological warfare are described.

Contact: kbobbitt@wagner.edu

PS 101-HO Introduction to Psychology — Dr. Wagner — Mondays & Wednesdays 2:40–4:10 pm

This Honors section of Introduction to Psychology is a survey course dealing with the major fields of psychology, including learning, perception, memory, motivation, development, social behavior, disorders of psychological functioning, and physiology of behavior. An introduction to the methodology, frameworks, and principles of contemporary scientific psychology.

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, this Honors course can be counted as a Social Science (S) course in the Knowledge Areas, and it provides the following Key Skill:

  • practice/exposure Quantitative Thinking (Q).

Contact: mwagner@wagner.edu

PS 209-HO / RE 209-HO Is Religion “Man-Made?” — Dr. Kaelber — Tuesdays 6:00–9:00 pm

Are religious “truths” divinely given or are they created by human beings? We will unravel this issue by approaching the question from various perspectives. We will begin by considering the way in which the story and celebration of Christmas is conditioned by cultural and political circumstances. We will also examine religious predictions regarding the “end of the world” and why people continue to hold these beliefs even when they are proven to be untrue. We will also examine Dante’s description of Hell in his Inferno. Students will then be given the opportunity of creating a modern vision of hell, along with its inhabitants and punishments.

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, the course number students choose will determine the Knowledge Area granted:

  • Social Science (S) if taken as PS 209

or

  • Humanities (H) if taken as RE 209

The following Key Skills are earned in this course:

  • intensive Intercultural Understanding (UU)
  • practice/exposure Creativity (C)
  • practice/exposure Critical Reading and Analysis (R)

Contact: wkaelber@wagner.edu

SPC 103-HO Public Speaking — Prof. Tennenbaum — Tuesdays & Thursdays 2:40–4:10

A hands-on, practical approach to the study and practice of effective oral communication. Through a series of speaking assignments students will develop strategies to assist them in organizing their thoughts and overcoming performance anxiety on their way to becoming effective speakers. Different types of speeches will be covered including informative, demonstrative and persuasive. The course also includes preparation for special occasion speeches (awards, honors, ceremonies, weddings, etc.) as well as one-on-one situations. The primary goal of the class is to create relaxed, confident speakers who can be comfortable in any situation, whether formal or socially casual.

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, this Honors course provides the following Key Skill:

  • intensive Oral Communication (OO)

Contact: michael.tennenbaum@wagner.edu

 

Honors Courses Offered in Previous Semesters

 

Fall Semester 2019

Spring Semester 2019

Fall Semester 2018

Spring Semester 2018

Fall Semester 2017

Spring Semester 2017

Fall Semester 2016

Spring Semester 2016

Fall Semester 2015

Spring Semester 2015

If you have questions about honors courses, please feel welcome to contact the Director of the Honors Program, Dr. Amy Eshleman (esh@wagner.edu).

 

Antium Font. Textbooks available on Reserve