Honors Courses

Honors courses are offered in every fall and spring semester. Honors courses have section numbers containing the letter H. Honors courses are more challenging, involve more discussion and debate, and often (if not always) require longer and more in-depth research papers and oral presentations by students. Honors courses are most certainly more demanding, usually involving more reading and preparation.

Any student with at least a 3.5 grade point average may enroll in an Honors course. Students who do not meet this criterion may request permission of the instructor to enroll in an Honors course.

Spring 2020 Honors Courses (Partial list as schedules are determined)

This class is an introduction to Geographic Information Software (GIS) and geomatics, the method and theory of collecting, managing, and using spatially referenced data. Geomatics is a transformative technology which is shaping the ways in which researchers from across the social, natural and physical sciences manage and combine multi-disciplinary data. Students will learn to find and make appropriate selection of pre-existing sets of data from public depositories. After an introduction to the basic methods of manipulating demographic, topographic and environmental information, students will develop and present a small project of their own design. Working with big data and complex computer programs can be difficult. However, careful control of the scope of project and practical considerations of available data will help produce successful projects. Offered as required. May be used to fulfill major and minor in Environmental Studies and Civic Engagement minor.

For students who entered Wagner College during or before Summer 2018, this Honors course fulfills the Technological Competency (TC) requirement.

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, this Honors course can be counted as a Social Science course in the Knowledge Areas, and it provides the following Key Skills: intensive Intercultural Understanding (UU) and intensive Technological Competency (TT).

Contact: joshua.mullenite@wagner.edu

For students who entered Wagner College during or before Summer 2018, this Honors course is writing intensive (W), fulfills the English literature requirement (LIT), and meets the International Perspectives requirement (I).

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, this Honors course counts as a Humanities (H) course in the Knowledge Areas and provides the following Key Skills:

  • intensive Intercultural Understanding (UU)
  • practice/exposure Critical Reading and Analysis (R)
  • intensive Written Communication (WW)

Contact: ahurley@wagner.edu

 

Dr. Snow

This course has several goals. First, to provide a comparative and critical understanding of the concept of ideology, and to introduce and analyze some of the most important contemporary political ideologies. We give particular attention to liberalism, conservatism, fascism, socialism, communism and Islamism. Second, the course aims to familiarize students with the origins and key concepts of contemporary political debates. Finally, by the end of the course students should identify which ideology (or ideologies) they find most convincing, as well as the most important criticisms of these ideologies. We will accomplish these goals by reading, thinking, talking and writing in depth about writings by, among others, Thomas More, Robert Owen, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Adam Smith, Murray Rothbard, Peter Singer, T.H. Green, Mikhail Bakunin, Emma Goldman, Sayyid Qutb and Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, this Honors course counts as a Social Science (S) course in the Knowledge Areas and provides the following Key Skill: intensive Critical Reading and Analysis (RR).

Contact: sgsnow@wagner.edu

Dr. Aurelus

This intermediate learning community (ILC), intended for Nursing majors, includes an Honors section of NR 224 Nutrition & Health. This ILC that looks at the cellular nutrition of eukaryotes (humans) vs. the nutrition of prokaryotes (bacteria). The ILC also covers the similarities and differences in the structure, function and role of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins and trace elements in humans and bacteria.  Finally, it looks at the immunological aspects of nutrition across the human life span compared to the immunological aspects in disease prevention.

Students seeking a more challenging approach to the study of Nutrition & Health are invited to take any section of MI 200 to complete the two-course ILC. (Allowing students to take any section of MI 200 is both a response to increased enrollment in the Nursing major and the goal of providing an Honors section of NR 224.)


MI 200 Microbiology — Bobbitt — Select any section of MI 200


MI 200L Microbiology Lab — Select any section of MI 200L (one 2-hour lab per week)


NR 224-HL Nutrition & Health — Aurelus — Fridays 8:00–11:00 am

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, NR 224 provides the following Key Skill: practice/exposure Information Literacy (L).

Contact: edna.aurelus@wagner.edu

Dr. Wagner

This Honors section of Introduction to Psychology is a survey course dealing with the major fields of psychology, including learning, perception, memory, motivation, development, social behavior, disorders of psychological functioning, and physiology of behavior. An introduction to the methodology, frameworks, and principles of contemporary scientific psychology.

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, this Honors course can be counted as a Social Science course in the Knowledge Areas, and it provides the following Key Skill: practice/exposure Quantitative Thinking (Q).

Contact: mwagner@wagner.edu

Prof. Tennenbaum

A hands-on, practical approach to the study and practice of effective oral communication. Through a series of speaking assignments students will develop strategies to assist them in organizing their thoughts and overcoming performance anxiety on their way to becoming effective speakers. Different types of speeches will be covered including informative, demonstrative and persuasive. The course also includes preparation for special occasion speeches (awards, honors, ceremonies, weddings, etc.) as well as one-on-one situations. The primary goal of the class is to create relaxed, confident speakers who can be comfortable in any situation, whether formal or socially casual.

For students who entered Wagner College in or after Fall 2018, this Honors course provides the following Key Skill: intensive Oral Communication (OO).

Contact: michael.tennenbaum@wagner.edu

 

Honors Courses Offered in Previous Semesters

 

Fall Semester 2019

Spring Semester 2019

Fall Semester 2018

Spring Semester 2018

Fall Semester 2017

Spring Semester 2017

Fall Semester 2016

Spring Semester 2016

Fall Semester 2015

Spring Semester 2015

If you have questions about honors courses, please feel welcome to contact the Director of the Honors Program, Dr. Amy Eshleman (esh@wagner.edu).

 

Antium Font. Textbooks available on Reserve