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March 2018

Archaeology Lecture: The Mississippian Period, Dr. Anna Semon

March 18 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

The Dr. George G. Hackman Memorial Lecture by Dr. Anna Semon (Director, North American Archaeology Lab, American Museum of Natural History)

Mississippian pottery production and use on the Georgia coast

The Mississippian period (A.D. 200–1580) on the Georgia coast consisted of chiefdoms structured by a diverse landscape of villages, council houses, mortuary sites, earthen mounds, and camp/processing areas.

Recent archaeological investigations of village and mortuary sites on St. Catherines Island, GA have provided new insight into Mississippian life on the coast, including village organization, subsistence practices, burial practices, wood-carving traditions, and pottery manufacturing.

In this lecture, we will focus on complicated-stamped pottery recovered from St. Catherines Island and discuss how this pottery can be used to reconstruct life along the Georgia coast on the cusp of European contact, especially the social interactions surrounding how the pottery was made and used.

Admission
ASSI lectures are free for ASSI and AIA members, students 22 years or younger
And Wagner Faculty and Staff - Please show ID

Others may attend ASSI lectures for a $5.00 donation or may join the ASSI at the door.

For more information contact
The Archaeology Society of Staten Island P.O. Box 140504
Staten Island, NY 10314-0504
Email: info@siarchaeology.org
www.siarchaeology.org

April 2018

Archaeology Lecture: Maritime Trade in Medieval Japan, Dr. Michelle Damian

April 8 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Archaeological Institute of America Lecture by Dr. Michelle Damian (Assistant Professor of History at Monmouth College)

Maritime Trade Networks of Medieval Japan</em

This study demonstrates that despite the political upheaval of Japan’s late medieval period (15th–16thc), trade connections within the Inland Sea region actually flourished, resulting in the beginnings of a regional commodities market.

Until now, it has been difficult to track maritime practices in this era due to the lack of written records of medieval seafaring. Using geospatial analysis of extant documentary and archaeological evidence, however, it becomes possible to discern the flow of certain commercial goods within the Seto Inland Sea region. Through this analysis it becomes apparent that smaller ports largely unrecorded in written documents were often critical transshipment hubs, facilitating trade in the region. Furthermore, geospatial analysis allows tracking of ship captains’ voyages, providing insight into medieval seafaring practices and proving the existence of complex individual and institutional maritime networks.

Admission
This lecture is FREE and open to all. Meet the speaker over coffee and cake following each lecture.

For more information contact
The Archaeology Society of Staten Island P.O. Box 140504
Staten Island, NY 10314-0504
Email: info@siarchaeology.org
www.siarchaeology.org

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